The Families of Dennis W. Brumm
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Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa

Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa



 


Media

Photos

» Slide Show
400 Block of Jefferson Street, Burlington, Iowa
400 Block of Jefferson Street, Burlington, Iowa
Seen at Christmas, this view of Burlington, Iowa, is in the old central business district. For years the area was declining due to mall fever, but recently, I am told, it is making something of a comeback.
Jefferson Street in Burlington, Iowa, in the 1930s
Jefferson Street in Burlington, Iowa, in the 1930s
The Arion Restaurant, Burlington, Iowa
The Arion Restaurant, Burlington, Iowa
The Arion Restaurant was located at 210 North Main Street in Burlington, Iowa. When I was a youth, my parents would occasionally take me there to eat. There weren't a lot of chic or expensive restaurants in southeast Iowa then (if any, really), but this always felt like a special treat to me to get to go out to this restaurant. It was divided in two parts, one part was basically a bar, and darker, as bars tend to be, the larger room was a restaurant proper. I particularly enjoyed their French salad dressing, which was a bit tart and very flavorful, a style common for the time. It spiced up the salads, which were mostly shredded iceberg lettuce with a little carrot and maybe several other vegetables in lean amounts, also standard for that era. It is no longer in operation.
The Roller Coaster at Crapo Park, Burlington, Iowa
The Roller Coaster at Crapo Park, Burlington, Iowa
Partial entry from Wikipedia (10/2010): "Crapo Park (85 acres, 34 hectares) is a city park with arboretum and botanical garden, located alongside the Mississippi River at Parkway Drive, Burlington, Iowa. Those who are not familiar with the park often mispronounce it as "Crap-O" Park while the correct pronunciation is Cray-po Park. It is reputed to be the site where the American flag was first raised on Iowa's soil, by Zebulon Pike in 1805."

This roller coaster photograph, taken in about 1985 as the small amusement park within Crapo decayed (since removed), was a very scary ride when I was a little kid. It was always a joy to go to the amusement park the times I would be there. Often this was with relatives, but my grade school would have yearly "end-of-term" picnics there each spring, a day off school, when we would also get to enjoy the rides.
Main Street, Looking South, Burlington, Iowa, in 1985
Main Street, Looking South, Burlington, Iowa, in 1985
The Great River Bridge at Burlington, Iowa
The Great River Bridge at Burlington, Iowa
This suspension bridge across the Mississippi River was built in the 1990s in Burlington. Before, the ancient MacArthur Bridge always seemed about ready to collapse anytime one was lucky enough to be driving across it to Illinois or back. The town on the other side of the bridge is (or was) Gulfport, Illinois. It has flooded many times, and apparently it is still not recovered from the last large flood of 2008; there was some talk of abandoning it afterward. Before the flood its population was about 200. Burlington's population hovers around 30,000. This photograph was provided courtesy of Becky Murphy.
Burlington, Iowa, in Winter
Burlington, Iowa, in Winter
Midwestern winters vary from somewhat mild to bitterly cold. The exact location of this home in Burlington is not known.
The Great River Bridge at Burlington, Iowa, at Night
The Great River Bridge at Burlington, Iowa, at Night
An Aerial View of Burlington, Iowa, and its Environs
An Aerial View of Burlington, Iowa, and its Environs
(Google Earth)
A View of Burlington, Iowa, looking North From Jefferson Street in Downtown
A View of Burlington, Iowa, looking North From Jefferson Street in Downtown
Rainbow in the Sky at Burlington, Iowa
Rainbow in the Sky at Burlington, Iowa
Taken from Menard's parking lot.
Church Skyline, Looking North From Downtown Burlington, Iowa
Church Skyline, Looking North From Downtown Burlington, Iowa
An Old North Hill Home in Burlington, Iowa
An Old North Hill Home in Burlington, Iowa
Burlington, being on the Mississippi River, is a city of hills, a rarity in Iowa, which is a bit rolling but normally flat. North Hill was where the wealthier families built their version of mansions in earlier times.
The Mississippi River at Burlington, Iowa
The Mississippi River at Burlington, Iowa
A Summer Band Concert, Crapo Park, Burlington, Iowa
A Summer Band Concert, Crapo Park, Burlington, Iowa
Snake Alley in Burlington, Iowa
Snake Alley in Burlington, Iowa
Touted as "The Crookedest Street in the World" (one of several streets so touted in the world), Snake Alley in Burlington often is the locale where various civic functions happen during the summer months.
The Curly-Q Slide at Crapo Park, Burlington, Iowa
The Curly-Q Slide at Crapo Park, Burlington, Iowa
As a young boy, this spiral slide was one of the most entertaining pasttimes when visiting Crapo Park in Burlington. An article at the online edition of The Hawk Eye, the Burlington city newspaper, dates the slide to between 1925-1930.

Documents

» Slide Show
The Burlington Route
The Burlington Route
An ad from the train history of Burlington, Iowa
F. L. and G. L. Unterkircher, Undertakers and Embalmers
F. L. and G. L. Unterkircher, Undertakers and Embalmers
Old obituaries often mention the Unterkircher undertaker service in Burlington, Iowa, which, if this ad from a Burlington City Directory is correct, provided "The Finest Turn-Outs in the City."
The Robert Donahue Iron & Hardware Company
The Robert Donahue Iron & Hardware Company
Taken from an ad in an old Burlington, Iowa, City Directory, Robert Donahue Iron & Hardware provided iron, steel, and nails, wagon, carriage, and heavy hardware.
North Hill Park
North Hill Park
A postcard of a home on North Hill in Burlington, Iowa. Provided courtesy of Marge Kimble.
Union Depot
Union Depot
A postcard of the Union Depot in Burlington, Iowa. Provided courtesy of Marge Kimble.
A Postcard, July 2, 1908 (front)
A Postcard, July 2, 1908 (front)
From Bertha Lett to her mother, Ella Matilda (Johnson) Lett. The message is "High School Bldg., Burlington, Iowa"
A Postcard on June 1, 1916 (front)
A Postcard on June 1, 1916 (front)
From Ann Clarinda Edger to Charles Pearsey Walker. The photo is of the Central Fire and Police Station in Burlington. A horse drawn wagon appears to be pulling a load of lumber.
Rustic Bridge, Crapo Park, Burlington, Iowa
Rustic Bridge, Crapo Park, Burlington, Iowa
This postcard, dated as from 1918, has the number 12155 on it as well.
View of Burlington and Rail Road Bridge Across the Mississippi, Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa
View of Burlington and Rail Road Bridge Across the Mississippi, Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa
This sketch of the bridge connecting Iowa to Illinois at Burlington, Iowa, was originally published in the book Portrait and Biographical Album of Des Moines County, Iowa; Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens of the County, Together with Biographies of all the Governors of the State, and of the Presidents of the United States (Acme Publishing, Chicago; 1888).
View From North Hill - Showing River Front, Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa
View From North Hill - Showing River Front, Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa
This sketch of the city of Burlington, Iowa, was originally published in the book Portrait and Biographical Album of Des Moines County, Iowa; Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens of the County, Together with Biographies of all the Governors of the State, and of the Presidents of the United States (Acme Publishing, Chicago; 1888).

Histories
The Biography of Charles G. Bosch (1854-1921)
The Biography of Charles G. Bosch (1854-1921)
Leslie Thomas "Les" Brumm began working for the Charles G. Bosch Company in Burlington, Iowa, by 1904. Later he and his family owned and managed the business. This is a biography of Charles G. Bosch, its founder.

The Text of the biography is:

Charles G. Bosch, conducting a profitable and growing plumbing and electric business in Burlington, belongs to that class of men who do not seek to figure prominently in public affairs nor occupy a spectacular position in public regard, but who by reason of their substantial qualities constitute a most valuable element in citizenship. Burlington claims him as a native son. He was born May 14, 1854, his parents, who were natives of Germany, having come to this country about 1851 or 1852, at which time the father opened a grocery store on West Washington street. In their family were seven children but only two survive, Charles Bosch and Mrs. Joseph Spies, both of Burlington. The father passed away almost four decades ago, after which his widow became the wife of John Dabb, who was a baker, conducting business on Washington street. The surviving daughter of that marriage is Mrs. Herman Wolfert, of West Burlington. The mother has passed away, however, and she and her two husbands now rest in Aspen Grove cemetery.

Charles G. Bosch pursued his early education in the German subscription schools and also attended the public schools of Burlington. He was eighteen years of age when he secured a position in the drug store of C. P. Squires, and subsequently he obtained employment in the plumbing establishment of Stewart L Hayden. At a later period he worked at the plumber's trade in Chicago and Denver, and with the passing years his skill, ability and resourcefulness steadily increased. In 1880 he built the gas plant in Creston, Iowa, which he operated for two years, and on the 1st of November, 1883, he established a plumbing business on Main street in Burlington, so that he has now been connected with the business for more than three decades. The beginning was small but as time passed on he had to increase his facilities to meet his growing trade and today he is conducting a very gratifying and successful plumbing and electric business.

On the 10th of October, 1882, occurred the marriage of Mr. Bosch and Miss Blanche Louisa Whitehead, a daughter of Josiah Whitehead, of Creston, Iowa. She died in 1910 and was buried in Burlington. In 1912 Mr. Bosch married Miss Clara Lau, of Burlington, a daughter of Nicholas and Caroline Lau. Her father conducts a meat market in this city. Mr. Bosch owns residence property in the city and also has other valuable real estate in Burlington. Fraternally he is connected with the Woodmen of the World and he also belongs to the Silver Lake Club. His political indorsement (sic) is usually given to the democratic party although he does not hesitate to vote independently if his judgment sanctions that course. He has been secretary of the Business Men's Club, in which he still holds membership, and he is likewise a member of the Commercial Club. He cooperates in every movement for the benefit and welfare of the city and is a consistent and faithful member of the German Lutheran church, which has found in him a generous supporter as have various charitable organizations. His life has been well spent, and the salient traits of his character are such as win high regard. His business ability has gained for him the trust of contemporaries and colleagues, and his devotion to the public good has placed him high on the roll of Burlington's progressive citizens.
The Burlington Gazette
The Burlington Gazette
The Burlington Gazette. This article was published in the 1915 book, edited by Augustine M. Antrobus, A History of Des Moines County, Iowa, and Its People. Illustrated, Volume II (Chicago: S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1915. The book is available for free download at Google Books online as of November 2010. The article features a history of the Burlington Gazette newspaper from 1838 up until the present day, which was 1915 when the book was published. Several decades later the Gazette merged with the other paper in town, The Hawk-Eye, giving Burlington a single newspaper. It has had several other names through the years, such as the Burlington Hawk-Eye Gazette, The Burlington Hawk-Eye, and finally, in 1972, the hyphen was removed and the paper became simply The Hawk Eye. The text of the 1915 article is:

History of Des Moines County (1915) The Burlington Gazette, pp. 47-50

One year older than the territory of Iowa, and consequently almost a decade the senior of the state of Iowa, the Burlington Daily Gazette of Burlington, Iowa, is undoubtedly the pioneer newspaper of this state. Born and bred in the trials and hardships of the frontier days, when Black Hawk, the Sac chief, and his braves combated with the white settlers from the east the ownership of Iowa's share of the widespread territory of Wisconsin, the Gazette's history, has been that of its native Iowa. Both from a crude beginning have waxed strong and powerful. Each has had its trials and tribulations, its ups and downs, its triumphs, and its failures and each is better for them. It is pleasant and gratifying for the senior to contemplate its junior's progress and the high rank it today holds in the union of the states and to know that its own influence and intelligent endeavor played no small part in bringing about the great Iowa of the twentieth century. And, in turn, the state of Iowa is glad to boast among its considerable number of intelligent, wide-awake and well edited newspapers, one of such conspicuous merit as the Gazette.

The Gazette was founded in 1837 by James Clarke, a practical printer and the last territorial governor of Iowa, and Cyrus Jacobs. Editor Jacobs, following a political dispute with Judge David Rorer, a prominent attorney, was shot and killed by Rorer, who escaped punishment through a plea of self-defense. Mr. Jacobs' interest in the paper was sold to John H. McKenny, who with Mr. Clarke remained in control until 1842, when James M. Morgan and Bernhart Henn succeeded them. Both were men of parts and took an active interest in the politics of the day, Mr. Morgan being speaker of the Iowa house for several terms, while Mr. Henn served two terms in the lower house of Congress. In 1845 the Gazette passed into the hands of Mr. Clarke, its founder, and William Tizzard, afterwards, for a period of eight years, postmaster of Burlington. Upon Mr. Clarke's appointment as governor of the territory his place on the paper was filled for a time by a Mr. Thurston, afterwards a prominent citizen of Oregon. Mr. Thurston was succeeded by a Dr. Gates, who sold out to Governor Clarke in 1848. In that year democracy swept the state, its victory in great measure being due to the influence wielded by the Gazette. In 1850 cholera broke out in Burlington and Governor Clarke was among the first victims. A young attorney named Childs took his place. Dr. Harvey, an eminent physician and father of Colonel Philip Harvey of the United States army's medical corps, assumed the editorship and for five years directed its destinies. Under the Harvey regime the Gazette was the state organ of the democratic party and championed Iowa's United States senators, George W. Jones and Augustus Caesar Dodge in the Kansas-Nebraska act.

When the territory was made a state in 1846, the Territorial Gazette became the Iowa State Gazette. Until 1853 it was a weekly but in that year was changed into a tri-weekly. Two years later, under the ownership of Colonel William Thompson and David Sheward, it became a daily paper. Colonel Thompson was for four years a member of the legislature and served with distinction in the Union army. In 1860 Mr. Taylor bought the paper and in 1862 Messrs. Todd and Bently became its owners and publishers. They changed the name of the paper and it was known as the Gazette and Argus. Two years after the close of the war Richard Barret and Charles I. Barker purchased the plant and the same year Mr. Barker became the sole owner. He dropped the name Argus from the paper, and it has ever since been known as the Gazette. Charles Playter appeared in May 1874, as part owner, but in the following September the Gazette was purchased by W. W. Blake of Burlington and W. R. Fitch of the Cedar Rapids Republican. The Gazette Printing Company was then established. Colonel John Bird soon after purchased an interest and assisted Mr. Blake in the editorship until 1876, when Wesley L. Barnes, Louis Melius and W. W. Blake bought it. The two first named gentlemen soon retired and Mr. Blake became sole owner. Following Mr. Blake's incumbency of the editorial chair A. C. Hutchinson held sway, with John H. Drabelle, now a prominent attorney of St. Louis, as political editor, Bert Smith, the present mayor of Sioux City, as city editor, and Ed Wesner, at present a leading fire insurance man of Burlington, Iowa, as business manager.

In May 1887, Thomas Stivers of Atchison, Kansas, and Henry Stivers of Osceola, Iowa, became the owners of the Gazette and published it for one year, when Thomas Stivers became absolute owner and was its editor and publisher until the day of his death, September 9, 1913, when he was succeeded by his only son, George A. Stivers. Mr. Stivers was a native of Ohio, but the greater part of his manhood had been spent in Kansas, where he had been successful as a newspaper man and contractor. He was a keen-sighted business man, a born newspaper man, a forcible writer, a man who thought straight, a courteous gentleman who made and kept friends and a worker of electric dynamo energy. It is to his wonderful industry, his steadfastness and his splendid intelligence that the Gazette owes so much of its eminent standing among the newspapers of the Mississippi valley today. How well he succeeded may be best demonstrated when it is understood that when he took the Gazette it was struggling along with a circulation of but five hundred, that its plant was a poorly equipped one and that its influence was on the wane, that he left it with its circulation at the eight thousand five hundred mark and still growing, its plant up-to-date in every way and it the most influential, widely read and quoted paper in its section of the country. His son who succeeds has been connected with the Gazette in various capacities from carrier up since he was a boy in his teens and is in every way fitted to maintain the Gazette at the standard of excellency set by his distinguished father.

The Gazette is democratic in politics and is the leading journal of that faith in Iowa. But it is not as a political organ that it enjoys its chief distinction or its ever-growing popularity. Its ability to gather the news, both local and foreign, and to present it to its readers in an attractive manner has made it the popular home paper of the community to which it caters. In Burlington it is a common saying that "everybody takes the Gazette," and it happens to be a true one, too, for over forty-five thousand copies are daily distributed in Burlington by its forty carrier boys. Its outside circulation is constantly growing, for the people of the adjacent towns and country are appreciating more and more each day the value of the paper that prints and delivers the news the day it happens. As an advertising medium it stands alone in its part of the country. The advertiser has learned that its columns bring results and the reader has every confidence in the merit of any advertisement that the Gazette will permit in its columns.

The Gazette is a member of the Associated Press, and through its leased wire running to its editorial rooms receives from ten thousand to fifteen thousand words each day of the news of the world. In addition it employs a staff of fifty correspondents throughout southeastern Iowa and western Illinois who keep Gazette readers well informed daily of all things of interest in their bailiwicks. How well the local field is covered is shown by the fact that in Burlington the Gazette circulates double the number of all other local publications combined.

It is the present purpose of the management to erect a building of its own in the near future and to further equip the paper so that it may continue to grow rapidly in the value of its usefulness.

General Newsprint
W. C. Coup's Great Show Day. Grand Excursion. (The Circus Comes to Burlington, Iowa, May 25, 1882)
W. C. Coup's Great Show Day. Grand Excursion. (The Circus Comes to Burlington, Iowa, May 25, 1882)
Text of the article:

W.C. Coup's New United Monster Shows and Great World's Fair, will exhibit in Burlington, on Thursday, May 25th (1882). Excursion trains will be run to bring visitors from the country at very low rates and we believe everybody is going.

Mr. Coup has secured many new features and extraordinary attractions in addition to the three full leading companies in an immense ring, it having been found that three rings distract the attention of the spectators and that their enjoyment is lessened in consequence.

A grand menagerie is made a special feature, as is a large Automatic Museum, with hundreds of moving figures, musical chariots, etc., moved by six steam engines.

Probably the most interesting novelty will be found in the Grand Historical Tableaux, representing the assassination of Garfield by Guiteau, in which there are said to be no less than five hundred figures, appropriately costumed with correct likenesses of all the persons connected with the trial, such as Judge Cox, Judge Porter, the jury, counsel, etc.

The figure of Guiteau will be dressed in the identical suit of clothes worn by him at the time of the assassination, and the clothes in which he was tried will also be exhibited.

Mr. Coup has also secured Be-Be the beautiful young girl, who performs the remarkable feat of leaping to the top of the pavilion and fluttering down like a bird. Mr. Coup also brings the main features of his wonderful New York Aquarium and Okenawaka's Indian Show, Professor Amos' band of Original Jubilee Singers, Cetewayo's Amazulu Princes and Suite.

Besides the band of music in the great procession, there are also four colossal steam power musical chariots twenty-five feet high, equal to hundreds of musicians. There will be a free balloon race with trapeze performances by Madame S. Clair and Signor Montifiori in mid-air during the day.

Obituary

Matches 2751 to 2800 of 4176

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   Last Name, Given Name(s)    Obituary    Person ID   Tree 
2751 Pfeiff, Marjorie M.  22 Jun 2005Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I25024 All Families 
2752 Pforts, Ethel Irene  19 Aug 1997Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I13040 All Families 
2753 Pforts, Frank Monroe  29 May 1964Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I13038 All Families 
2754 Pforts, Grace E.  5 Mar 2008Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I13048 All Families 
2755 Pforts, Henry Dean "Dean"  28 Feb 1999Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I13046 All Families 
2756 Pforts, Louis  20 May 1965Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I56884 All Families 
2757 Pforts, Raymond Orville "Orville"  18 Jul 1983Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I2223 All Families 
2758 Phelps, Maxine D.  7 Jul 2002Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I31706 All Families 
2759 Phillips, Jeri Lynn  7 Apr 2005Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I9737 All Families 
2760 Phillips, Jerry Arthur  24 May 2004Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I9775 All Families 
2761 Philp, Lois Maud  17 Feb 2011Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I33100 All Families 
2762 Philpott, Doris M.  5 Feb 1979Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I57283 All Families 
2763 Pickard, Raymond Lavern  17 Aug 2007Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I17449 All Families 
2764 Pickle, Dorothy Clara  5 Jun 1997Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I5662 All Families 
2765 Pickle, Hazel Madeline  18 Nov 2008Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I5663 All Families 
2766 Pickle, Richard Jack "Jack"  20 Jun 1996Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I5665 All Families 
2767 Pickle, Velma Lee  26 May 1993Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I5666 All Families 
2768 Pickle, William Lee "Lee"  4 Nov 1987Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I5624 All Families 
2769 Pieper, Ruth C.  4 Jun 2012Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I26070 All Families 
2770 Pierce, Orin T.  11 Sep 1980Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I38892 All Families 
2771 Pierson, Albin George  1 Mar 1979Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I47938 All Families 
2772 Pierson, Margaret Anna Elaine  16 Aug 1998Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I53199 All Families 
2773 Pilling, Charlie Earl "Jack"  5 Apr 1982Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I3560 All Families 
2774 Pilling, Constance Joanne "Connie"  5 May 1995Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I11069 All Families 
2775 Pilling, Delbert Detlef "Dub"  19 Sep 2007Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I17312 All Families 
2776 Pilling, Dorothy Louise  19 Dec 2000Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I5375 All Families 
2777 Pilling, Julie JanEtte  1 Jan 2008Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I11076 All Families 
2778 Pilling, Mary Charlotte  31 Mar 1982Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I7360 All Families 
2779 Pilling, Mildred Maxine "Shorty"  26 Jul 2005Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I5376 All Families 
2780 Pilling, Ray Wayne "R. W."  8 Jun 1989Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I4520 All Families 
2781 Pilling, Russell C.  13 Jun 1967Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I5371 All Families 
2782 Pilling, William Albert  29 Mar 1946Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I10045 All Families 
2783 Pilling, William Wayne  8 May 1974Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I5109 All Families 
2784 Ping, Minnie Ethel  27 Mar 1948Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I18642 All Families 
2785 Piper, Charles William  16 May 1955Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I12270 All Families 
2786 Piper, Daisy Arnena  4 Jan 1979Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I22033 All Families 
2787 Piper, Flora Malissa  19 Jan 1937Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I948 All Families 
2788 Piper, George M.  5 Nov 1951Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I12267 All Families 
2789 Piper, Lloyd Keith  26 Oct 1964Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I21542 All Families 
2790 Piper, Maudie Marie  6 May 1987Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I57201 All Families 
2791 Piper, William E. "Bill"  26 May 2012Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I17021 All Families 
2792 Pitney, Helen E.  22 Oct 1997Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I27175 All Families 
2793 Platt, Dick Duane  21 Aug 1954Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I16019 All Families 
2794 Platt, Donald R.  31 Jul 2002Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I16007 All Families 
2795 Platt, Ralph John Sr.  23 Apr 1965Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I16008 All Families 
2796 Pobuda, Jacine E.  17 May 2003Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I26180 All Families 
2797 Pogemiller, Albert W.  12 Jan 1995Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I32669 All Families 
2798 Pogemiller, Charles Fred  8 Dec 1974Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I13561 All Families 
2799 Pogemiller, Charles Otis  9 Jan 1953Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I12689 All Families 
2800 Pogemiller, Donald McCloud  30 Aug 1965Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I4803 All Families 

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Residence

Matches 2751 to 2754 of 2754

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   Last Name, Given Name(s)    Residence    Person ID   Tree 
2751 Zurmuehlen, Timothy Lee "Tim"   I31810 All Families 
2752 Zurmuehlen, Timothy Lee "Tim"   I31810 All Families 
2753 Zurmuehlen, William C. "Will"  Jun 1949Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I50536 All Families 
2754 Zurmuehlen, William C. "Will"  Sep 1952Burlington, Des Moines County, Iowa I50536 All Families 

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