The Families of Dennis W. Brumm
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Charles Pearsey Walker

Charles Pearsey Walker

Male 1843 - 1922

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  • Name  Charles Pearsey Walker  [1, 2
    Born  13 Apr 1843  Milton, Wayne County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4, 5
    Gender  Male 
    Census  1850  Milton, Wayne County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    • Charles Walker, age 7, male, born in Indiana
    Residence  1856  Des Moines County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    • The Walker family at first lived in Pleasant Grove Township, directly east of New London, Henry County, Iowa
    Residence  Between 1856 and 1862  Pleasant Grove Township, Des Moines County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    • Chalres worked as a farmhand. (Previously it was thought he was working away from his family, but this is where Francis S. Walker's family lived at the time of the 1860 federal census.)
    Census  1860  Pleasant Grove Township, Des Moines County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    • Charles Walker, age 17, male, occupation farmer, born in Indiana, attended school during census year
    Letters and Cards  6 Sep 1862  Davenport, Scott County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    • (This letter was written in 1862 by Charles Pearsey Walker to his father; he later deserted - probably while still in Davenport, and reenlisted in November under the name Charles Pearsey.)

      Davenport [Iowa], September 6, 1862

      I take my pen in hand to write you a few lines I am well at present hoping that this may find you the same I have written one letter to day but thinking that it would not go I concluded to writ you a letter for I don't do any thing else but w(a)it I have just come from Rock Island I went over in a skiff to see the cars(?) it began to rain when I was over there and I had a jolly time comeing back in the rain It has been raining ever since night before last stoping a little once in awhile one Captain has just to Burlington. I don't think we will leave here for several months yet if you have any money to spare and can send us some dollars we will come home and stay a few days but if you cannot spare it well dont send it I want you to writ and tell me how you are getting along generally no more at present

      but remain your most effectionat son
      Charles P Walker
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Father, Francis Samuel 'Sam' Walker
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Father, Francis Samuel "Sam" Walker
    Charles wrote to his father September 6, 1862, while stationed in Davenport, Iowa, waiting for his regiment to leave and go to war. In this letter he requests some spare money, if his father has any, so he might return to see his father and family near New London, Iowa. Charles deserted the army soon thereafter, and reenlisted, because this upset his father, in the Iowa 34th using his mother's maiden name as his surname (i.e. his middle name), as "Charles Pearsey." (The scan of this letter was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    Military  Between 22 Nov 1862 and 15 Aug 1865  [9
    • Charles enlisted in the 34th Iowa Infantry during the Civil War. (Some friends' photos sent home: Anderson Gartin - on the back side of the photograph it said "Freedom, Friend, Iowa;" also photos of George Stultz, Captain Waters)

      Military records: 34 Iowa

      Charles Pearcy*, Pvt, Companies A and D, 34 Reg't Iowa Infantry.
      Appears on Returns as follows:
      Nov, 1862, Enlisted in Regt, November 22, Burlington, Iowa
      February and March 1863, Absent sick in Hosp. St. Louis Mo. since January 26/63.
      November 1864 (Co D) Chopping wood in Z.? M. D.
      *Also Persey and Piercy.
      Sitler, copyist.


      34th Iowa Infantry.

      Discharge papers:
      To all whom it may Concern:

      Know ye, That Charles Pearsey, a private of Captain Jonathan R. Waters Company ("D",)' 34" Regiment of Iowa Infantry VOLUNTEERS who was enrolled on the Twenty-second day of November one thousand eight hundred and Sixty two to serve three years or during the war, is hereby Discharged from the service of the United States, this Fifteenth day of August, 1865, at Houston, Texas, in compliance with [an executive? order]

      (No objection to his being reenlisted is known to exist.)

      Said Charles Pearsey was born in Rush County in the state of Indiana, is 20 (sic) years of age, five feet four inches high, light complexion, black eyes, black hair, and by occupation, when enrolled, a Blacksmith. Given at Houston, Texas, this Fifteenth day of August, 1865.
    The Military Discharge Certificate of Charles Pearsey Walker
    The Military Discharge Certificate of Charles Pearsey Walker
    Charles was discharged August 15, 1865, in Houston, Texas. (He was 5'4" tall.)
    The Military Record of Charles Pearsey Walker
    The Military Record of Charles Pearsey Walker
    During the Civil War, Charles was in the Iowa Thirty-Fourth Infantry Regiment. He enlisted November 22, 1862, in Burlington, Iowa, under the name "Charles Pearsey" and was discharged August 15, 1865, at Houston, Texas.
    A Timeline of the 34th Iowa Infantry in The Civil War
    A Timeline of the 34th Iowa Infantry in The Civil War
    Organized at Burlington, Iowa, and mustered in October 15, 1862.
    Mustered out August 15, 1865, in Houston, Texas. The regiment lost during the course of service 1 Officer and 11 Enlisted Men killed and mortally wounded, and 2 Officers and 244 Enlisted Men by disease. Total 258. (Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    A History of the Iowa Thirty-Fourth Regiment During the Civil War
    A History of the Iowa Thirty-Fourth Regiment During the Civil War
    By J. S. CLARK, Historian of the Regiment; Des Moines, Iowa, September 15, 1892. (Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    Letters and Cards  3 Dec 1862  [10
    • Mouth of the White River (Arkansas) - December 3rd '62

      It is with pleasure I seat my self to write you a few lines. I reed 3 letters from home. 1 from Lue one from papa one from May all of which I was glad to get. I was glad to hear that you were all well and doing well. I am as well common (?) exsept (sic) being pretty badly poisened but I am able to go around. I have not had any letter from Wm. lately. I had one from Vashti a few days ago. She was well. There is nothing going on here of importance that I know of. There is no prospect of going away from this plase. I am in hopes we wil get to stay here this winter. We have had some pretty disagreeable weather since we came here. We had about as hard a rain last night as I ever saw and as luck would have it I was on picket but managed to keep dry. Well, I believe from what you write you are getting along better with your business than if the boys was at home. There is one thing certain if I was at home you would not have had any apples to sell for I am a great apple eater when I can get them. There is not much prospect of us getting pay soon I think. Uncle Sam is getting in debt pretty deep and he had better begin to pay up. I was glad to get the postage stamps you sent me for I can't buy any here. I don't think hard of you for not writing oftener for I know you must have a great deal of work to do. If I can here from home often I will be satisfied. well I have no more to write this in answer to all letters I have reed from home since I came here. Direct your letters to Company D 34th Iowa via Cairo no more but remain as ever.

      Charles

      Enclosed find Captain R. Watters. Take good care of him until I get out of the service.

      Charles
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Family
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Family
    On December 3, 1862, Charles wrote his family from the mouth of the White River in Arkansas. He mentioned that "Uncle Sam" was getting very much in debt and not paying the army, how much he would like some apples to eat, and that he didn't blame the family for not writing more often, as he knew they were busy (likely a hint). He also sent a photograph of Captain Watters, which he asked his nephew, Charles Francis Walker, to keep until he returned from the war. (The scan of this letter was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    Letters and Cards  1863  Vicksburg, Warren County, Mississippi Find all individuals with events at this location  [11, 12
    • Dear Friends

      I take the present opportunity of writing you a few. I am wel at present and hope that this may find you all wel, we are below the city we have got the rebels completely surrounded and we starving them out. It is reported by deserters and negroes from the city that they are living on mule flesh and what water they get comes from the river. When they go after it our gun boats plays on them and kills a great many of them the dead mules are floating down the river all the time. They are mostly killed by our batterys which are playing them day and night. the rebels don't reply any more. yesterday they come down on our forces without any arms with the intention

      (Some text/letter edges missing:)

      ......... rough our lines but
      .......... with a thousand
      ......... come with for they got hold of some of the union pills and stoped very suden to sleep awhile. wel I guess it is not worth while for me to writ any more news about the City for I suppose you get all the news. The 15th Iowa come down when we did. I seen Jim ??? ??? and the rest of the Boys. I have not heard from Wm. for over 4 weeks I would [like] to know where he is I ..??.. several letters home before we left Pilot Kno(b) but have not any ansues I have not got any more news to writ Make you ne(...) not be troubled about me if you don't get any more letters for some time from me for I don't know when I will get to writ again but if any thing happens to me you will hear it now I want you to writ as soon as you can and let me know

      (Page 3 - No Scan)

      how you are___________________ and when ? ______________ and what Lee is doing_______ present but remain as ever tour son and brother Lo(?) Charles P. Walker.

      Monday 15th we have moved nearer to the enemy. I got a letter from Wm and Leander today they was well then. I am going to write to them as soon as possible no more at present

      Charles P Walker

      On the back of this letter someone wrote: "Written by C. P.Walker at the
      siege of Vicksburg, Miss. 1864. Company D 31st Ia. Inf." (It was 1863 and the 34th Regiment)
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Friends During the Siege of Vicksburg
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Friends During the Siege of Vicksburg
    Charles wrote a letter to his "friends," (presumably family since the document was in family hands) from the Siege of Vicksburg, which occurred throughout May and June of 1863. He reported the Union troops had "surrounded the rebels" and were starving them out, food was scarce, dead mules were seen constantly floating down the river, and, judging from the tone of the letter, he was definitely concerned about his own safety. This letter was written in June of 1863, and a later paragraph in it was dated Monday June 15 (which was in 1863). Charles had been in Pilot Knob, Missouri, as recently as May 22, when he wrote another letter home. Parts of this letter are missing. The third page was not scanned and what remains of it that can be read is:

    "[...] how you are [...] and when ? [...] and what Lee is doing [...] present but remain as ever tour son and brother Lo(?) Charles P. Walker.

    Monday 15th - we have moved nearer to the enemy. I got a letter from Wm and Leander today they was well then. I am going to write to them as soon as possible no more at present. Charles P Walker"

    On the back of this letter someone wrote: "Written by C. P. Walker at the siege of Vicksburg, Miss. 1864. Company D 31st Ia. Inf." However, the siege was in 1863 and he was in the 34th Regiment. (The scan of this letter was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. Note: This document is provided in pdf format, except for the third page text above.)
    Letters and Cards  22 May 1863  Pilot Knob, Iron County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    • Pilot Knob Missouri, May 22 1863

      Dear sisters

      I received your very kind letter yesterday which gave me general satisfaction I was truely glad to hear that all the folks was wel I am wel at present and sincerely hope that this may find you all well. I sent a letter to Mother a few days ago you did not say whether you got that letter with my money in it or not I got two letters from the roses(?) of Iowa but don't say any thing about it for I don't make a business of telling it. I have not heard from Wm. lately but the last I heard from home he was well. I had quite a quarrell with our orderly seargeant I told him that I thought we would both be citizens some day and if he was not any better man than me he would get whiped or I would one of the two. I told him that I was going to heed my rights and so that the other boys had theirs too I just naturally told him that the next time he detailed me I would not go. I also informed him that he had been partial to some of the boys but he denied it but when I got through with him the Lieutenant said I had done just right wel. Lou I wish you had told me when the weding was coming off a week sooner but as it is I will not get to be there I think I could get a furlough this summer but I don't like the idea of going home and then coming back again so I guess I will stay till my time is out and then I can go home and stay a good while if I choose to do so. Lou I don't want to enjoy myself any better than I do at the present time well Lou I think it must be a natural failing in that neighborhood to shower folks before they are married my self I am truly glad that we didn't get on the good side of the day at anynot? Well Lu I dreamed of evil (a horse?) last night I want you to writ and tell me how he is getting along along take good care of him and feed him all he can eat tell Kate I want her hurry and learn to writ so she can writ me a letter. Wil(?) told me she could read pictures and tell her that she shall have that pony when I get home sure real Sory excuse me for not writing any better for i have a great deal of writing to do these times and have to writ in a hury and have got this very dirty ... .. and I ... and I'd answer well give my love to all no more at present but remain your effectionate brother Charles P Walker to his sisters farewell
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Sisters and Niece, Mary Catharine Brewer
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Sisters and Niece, Mary Catharine Brewer
    Charles wrote this letter on May 22, 1863, from Pilot Knob, Missouri, to his sisters and niece. All of his sisters at that time were presumably living at the family farm in Baltimore Township, Henry County, Iowa (Vashti Annie (Walker) Brewer, Lovinia ("Lou") Church, Ann Clarinda, and Margaretta Catharine Walker). He mentions an unknown wedding that will take place, which he cannot attend, also that he sent money home, so he had apparently been paid (another letter dated December 1862 mentioned Uncle Sam was in arrears paying the troops). Apparently he was having some troubles with one of his commanding officers. (The scan of this letter was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    Letters and Cards  4 Sep 1863  near Carrollton, Orleans Parish, Louisiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    • Camps Near Carrolton

      Friday September 4, 1863

      I take the present opportunity of penning you a few lines to inform you I am well, and I hope these few lines may find you all well and enjoying your selves. I got a letter from Wm. yesterday dated August 22nd. He was well as common.

      Wee are under marching orders. Wee are ordered to be ready at 12 o'clock to march at 3 hours notice. But I don't think we will to to day. For we are going to have General Review today. U. S. Grant is going be out to review the troops. Of course there will be a big time of it out here. This will be our 3rd grand review since we came here. You wanted to know whether I got the wedding cake or not. I did. It was in that letter that was stopped at Cairo and that was the reason it was stopped. It did not taste very natural after laying in the post office. You stated in that letter that [h???] had caut the consumption. that is very bad to because that is very fatal. You must take good care of old Maners for he has been a good and faithful servant. Well I don't know what to write next. But I guess I will write some to Kate. Katy I want you to go to school and learn to write and read and cipher and so you can write me a letter and when the war ends I will get you a pretty little pony so you can ride to church and over to Uncle Billys and every place that you want to go. Now Catherine be a good girl and be good to Grand Pop and Mother and help them all you can. Take good care of the eggs for when I get home I will want about a bushel to eat lots of bread and milk and honey and get as big as Mary. Now be a good girl and don't get mad for ugly girls get mad. No more. Little Katy write soon.

      Your loving Uncle Charles to Catherine Brewer.
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Sisters
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Sisters
    The final letter from the Civil War that remains in the family archives from Charles Pearsey Walker was written to his sisters September 4, 1863. He was near Carrollton in Orleans Parish, Louisiana. The family had sent him some wedding cake, but it had not fared well sitting at the post office. A family horse, apparently, had contracted tuberculosis. He encouraged his niece, Mary Catharine Brewer, to learn to write, and promised her a pony upon his return. Ulysses S. Grant was going to be there to review the troops, which had apparently become a commonplace occurrence. (The scan of this letter was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    Politics  Between 1864 and 1922  [15
    • Charles was a lifelong Republican. He voted for Abraham Lincoln and continued voting Republican the rest of his life.
    Occupation  Between 1866 and 1915  [1, 16
    farmer 
    Census  1870  New London Township, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [17
    • (Listed with his wife, Ruth E., and son, Samuel N. Walker:) Line Number: 4, Dwelling Number: 61, Family Number: 58: Charles Walker, age 27, male, white, occupation farmer, value of personal estate $100, born in Indiana, male over 21 years of age
    Legal  Between 1875 and 1876  [18
    • On September 2, 1875, Nathaniel Fox loaned son-in-law Charles Pearsey $360 which was paid back in February 26, 1876.
    A Loan to Charles Persey Walker by his Father-in-Law, Nathaniel Fox
    A Loan to Charles Persey Walker by his Father-in-Law, Nathaniel Fox
    Nathaniel Fox loaned Charles Pearsey Walker $360 on September 2, 1875, in New London, Iowa. $77.75 was paid back February 26, 1876, and $145 on October 7, 1876. Other payments are not liste, but written on the paper is "Paid $376.82."
    Census  1880  New London Township, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [19
    • (Married to Ruth Ellen, living with her and children: Sam, "Verny," and Thomas:) Line Number 32, Dwelling Number 46, Family Number 48: Charles Walker, white, male, age 37, head of household, married, occupation farmer, born in Indiana, father born in Tennessee, mother born in Ohio
    Residence  Between 1884 and 1922  Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Iowa State Census  1885  Morning Sun Township, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [20
    • (Married to Ruth E., living with her and children: Samuel "M.," Verna, Thomas, Leander, and Flossie Walker:) Line number: 12, Dwelling number: 100, Family number: 106: Charles P. Walker, 73 Township, Range 73, Section 27; Address SW NE 4; age 41, male, married, occupation farmer, born in Indiana, father's nativity: native, mother's nativity: native, subject to military duty, entitled to vote
    Miscellaneous  26 May 1888  [21
    • Statement of Account.

      Morning Sun, Iowa, May 26, 1888
      Mr. Chas. P. Walker
      To D. H. Morrison, Di.

      Dealer in

      Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots, Shoes, Etc.

      1 hat .35
      6 pr. hose .50
      2 pr. hose .25
      1 pr gloves .30
      Thread .05
      1 parasol .60
      6 yds cottonade @.25 1.50
      1 pr. rubbers .45
      1 pr. plow shoes 1.50
      1 pr. goah(?) shoes 2.50
      2 pr. shoes boys 4.00

      (total due) $12.00
    Statement of Account at D. H. Morrison in Morning Sun, Iowa, May 26, 1888
    Statement of Account at D. H. Morrison in Morning Sun, Iowa, May 26, 1888
    According to this statement, D. H. Morrison ran a Dry Goods/Clothing Store in Morning Sun Iowa in 1888. Charles Pearsey Walker owed $14.00 to the store for various purchases on May 26 of that year. Also available is his statement of October 31, 1888. Provided courtesy of Marge Kimble.
    Miscellaneous  31 Oct 1888  [22
    • Statement of Account.
      Morning Sun, Iowa, October 31, 1888
      Mr. Chas. P. Walker

      To D. H. Morrison, Di.
      Dealer in
      Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots, Shoes, Etc.

      Yarn .25
      Thread .10
      3 yds. Delain .15 .45
      2 yds. Caubric .15 .30
      12 yds Calico .08 .96
      4 yds Calico .07 .28
      (Total due) $2.26
    Statement of Account at D. H. Morrison in Morning Sun, Iowa, October 31, 1888
    Statement of Account at D. H. Morrison in Morning Sun, Iowa, October 31, 1888
    Statement of Account at D. H. Morrison in Morning Sun, Iowa
    According to this statement, D. H. Morrison ran a Dry Goods/Clothing Store in Morning Sun Iowa in 1888. Charles owed $4.26 to the store for several purchases on October 31 of that year. Also available is his statement of May 26, 1888. Provided courtesy of Marge Kimble.
    Iowa State Census  1895  Morning Sun Township, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [23
    • (Listed with children: Thomas, Charles L., Flossie, and James Walker, and his sister, Lovinia Walker:) Charles P. Walker, age 51, male, widowed, born Indiana
    Census  1900  Morning Sun Township, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [24
    • (Widowed, living with his children: Thomas, Charles L., Flossie, and James Walker, and his Sister, Luvinia Walker:) Line number 65; dwelling number 277, family number 275: Charles Walker, head of household, white, male, born in April 1843, age 57, widowed, born in Indiana, father born in Tennessee, mother born in Virginia, occupation (nothing listed), could read, could write, could speak English, owned home, a farm (not a house), number of farm in schedule: 29
    Research  1903  Newport, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [25
    • On the back side of a photograph of the "Walker Homestead" near Newport, Iowa, there is the following writing, apparently from Flossie Z. (Walker) Russell: "S. N. Walker farm home (built originally for Charles P. Walker), built the same year Aunt Flossie was married. Sam Dotson did the carpentry work - 1906 (sic: 1903) Built for Chas. P. Walker."
    Iowa State Census  1905  Morning Sun Township, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [26
    • (C. P. Walker is listed with his son Lee, twice, as "C. L." and "L. C." Walker, also with Sarah A., Thomas, and J. G. Walker:) Card #: 688, C. P. Walker, Post Office: Morning Sun Iowa
    Census  1910  Morning Sun Township, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [27
    • (Married to Sarah A., living with her and sons Thomas and James G. Walker:) Line number 70: dwelling number: 23, family number: 24: Charles P. Walker, head of household, male, white, age 67, married (twice), years of present marriage 7, birthplace Indiana, father's birthplace Tennessee, mother's birthplace Virginia, could speak English, occupation own income, could read, could write, owned home, a house (not a farm)
    Biography  1911  [3
    History of Louisa County, Iowa, From Its Earliest Settlement to 1911 
    • One of Louisa County's agriculturists who donned the blue and went to the front in those perilous days of the '60s is C. P. Walker, who was born in Wayne County, Indiana, on the 13th of April, 1843. He is the son of Francis S. and Catharine Pearsey Walker, natives of Virginia and Tennessee respectively (sic: Tennessee and Virginia), both of whom have passed away. They were parents of eight children, in order of birth as follows: Vashti, the widow of John Edgar, of Henry County; Leander, deceased; Lovinia, of New Mexico; Rebecca, deceased; William P. of Missouri; C. P., our subject; Clarinda Ann, the wife of William Edgar, Henry County; and Maggie, the wife of Jesse Vaughn, of Sioux City.

      C. P. Walker came to Iowa with his family in 1856, locating in Henry County, where he worked as a farm hand for one year, and then went to Des Moines County where he remained for five years. At the expiration of that period he returned to Henry County where he continued to reside until the 22nd of November, 1862, when he enlisted in the Union army, going to the front with the Thirty-fourth Infantry. He was sent from Helena, Arkansas, to Chicago with Rebel prisoners, and from the latter city he went to Vicksburg, where he joined General Sherman, participating in the siege of that southern stronghold. On the 15th of August 1865, he was mustered out at Houston, Texas, and was paid off on the 22nd of September, 1865, at Davenport, Iowa. Mr. Walker was at Fort Morgan when Farragut ran the blockade and captured the Confederate ironclad, Tennessee.

      After receiving his discharge he returned to Henry County, Iowa, where he farmed an eighty acre tract which he rented three years. At the end of that time he was married and subsequently, went to Nebraska, where he resided for a year. Returning to Iowa in 1869, he rented one hundred and twenty acres for fourteen years and then went to Texas for a year. In 1884 he came to Louisa County, where he purchased three hundred acres of land, but he has since disposed of all but fifty-seven acres, upon which he continues to reside. He has placed all improvements upon his property and is engaged in general farming and stock-raising.

      On the 4th of July, 1868, Mr. Walker was united in marriage to Miss Ruth E. Fox, and by this union there were born eight children as follows: Samuel N., a resident of Louisa county; Everna, the wife of E. C. Frizzell, of Clarke county; Albert, deceased; Thomas, at home; Leander, also of Louisa county; Flossie, who married John Russell, of this county; James G., at home; and John, deceased. The wife and mother passed away in December 1890 (sic: December 29, 1889) and for his second wife Mr. Walker married Mrs. Sarah A. (Houseman) Edgar, the widow of Thomas Edgar. They were wed on 6th of July, 1902.

      Mr. and Mrs. Walker affiliate with the Christian church, and he is also a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. His first vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln on a steamer on the Mississippi River, and his political allegiance has ever since been given to the Republican party. He has never participated in public affairs, not being an aspirant for office, but when his services are needed in the support of any just cause he is ever found to be as willing and loyal as his allegiance was in the '60's.
    Letters and Cards  5 Apr 1915  New London, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [28
    • Postmark: New London, Iowa; April 5, 11 a.m. 1915
      To: Mr. C. P. Walker; Morning Sun, Iowa; RFD

      Monday morning. --

      Received you(r) card about the eggs. Will have them by the last of the week if nothing happens. Art will try to bring them & guinne (guineas?) out. Hope you are all well. Love to all, Bertha E.

      (Bertha was Bertha Belle [Eddingfield] Edgar)
    Residence  Mar 1916  Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [29
    Census  1920  Morning Sun Township, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [30
    • (Married to Sarah, living with her and son, Tom Walker:) Line number 73: farm, dwelling number: (none), family number: (none): Charles P. Walker, head of household, owned home, free of mortgage, male, white, age 76, married, could read, could write, born in Indiana, father's birthplace Tennessee, mother's birthplace Virginia, could speak English, occupation manager, nature of industry farm, own account, number of farm in schedule: 101
    American Civil War Soldiers 
    • Name: Charles Pearsey; Residence: Burlington, Iowa; Enlistment Date: 22 November 1862; Side Served: Union; State Served: Iowa; Service Record: Enlisted as a Private on 22 November 1862 at the age of 20. Enlisted in Company A, 34th Infantry Regiment Iowa on 22 November 1862. Mustered Out Company A, 34th Infantry Regiment Iowa on 15 August 1865 at Houston, Texas.
    Bible 
    • Samuel Francis Walker was born in Knox Co. Tennessee May 4, 1809. [His headstone says May 6 and "Francis Samuel" although he went by the name Sam]

      Catharine Pearsy (sic) Walker was born near the natural bridge Virginia February 3, 1805. [A History of the Pearsey Family lists this as November 3, 1804.]

      Vashti Anne Walker was born Jan 27, 1835, in Milton, Wayne Co, Indiana

      Leander Walker was born Oct 4, 1836, in Milton, Indiana

      Rebecca Walker was born May 4 1838 in Milton, Indiana

      Louvinia Church Walker was born December 1, 1839, in Milton, Indiana

      William Pearsy (sic) Walker was born June 6, 1841, in Milton, Indiana

      Charles Pearsy (sic) Walker was born in Milton, Indiana, April 13, 1843

      Ann Clarinda was born May 15 1846 in Milton, Indiana

      Margaretta Catharine Walker was born Sep 26, ----- [1848] in Milton Indiana

      (A digital scan of this image was provided courtesy of Marge (Kimble) Walker.)
    Military 
    • More military records of Charles Pearsey Walker:

      P 34 Iowa.
      Charles Pearsey, Pvt., Co. D, 34 Reg't Iowa Infantry.

      Appears on
      M. and D. Roll of Men Transferred to the organization named above by consolidation. Roll dated November 26, 1864. Present or absent: Not-Stated. Company from which transferred: [nothing]. Remarks: Transferred from Company A 34 Iowa to Company D 34 Batt. Iowa Inf. pen S. F. O. No. 17 Hd. Qrs. 19. A. C. in compliance with G. O. No. 86, War Dep't. (Copied by Ashley)

      P 34 Iowa.
      Charles Pearsey, Pvt. Old Co. A., 34 Reg't. Iowa Infantry. Appears on Company Muster Roll for September & Oct., 1864. Joined for duty and enrolled: When: November 22, 1862, Where: Burlington, Period: 3 (y)ears. Present or absent: Present. Stoppage, $ (nothing), Due Gov't, $ (due nothing). Remarks: Increased pay ? as Pvt. ? ? ?.
    Transfer Records and Muster Roll Records of Charles Pearsey Walker
    Transfer Records and Muster Roll Records of Charles Pearsey Walker
    Records of the 34th Iowa infantry for Charles Pearsey Walker, a transfer from Company A to Company D, pay increase, and muster roll records.
    Occupation  Abt 1918/1922  Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    • In Charles P. Walker's final years of life, he managed a general store in Morning Sun.
    Died  8 Mar 1922  near Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 5, 33
    Funeral Program  9 Mar 1922  Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [34
    • CHARLES WALKER
      Died March 8, 1922.
      Age 79 years.

      "Gone but not forgotten"

      A precious one from us has gone
      A voice we loved is stilled;
      A place is vacant in our home,
      Which never can be filled.
      God in His wisdom has recalled,
      The boon his love had given,
      And though the body slumbers here,
      The soul is safe in Heaven.

      Copyright 1912 by H. F. Wendell, Leipsic, Ohio
    Buried  9 Mar 1922  Ferrel Cemetery, New London Township, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 5, 33
    Obituary  13 Mar 1922  Davenport, Scott County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [35
    The Davenport Democrat and Leader 
    • Charles Walker is Buried at Morning Sun

      Morning Sun (IA), March 13 -- Funeral services of the late Chas. P. Walker, who passed away March 8th, were held from the home two miles east of here, March 9, 1922, conducted by Chas. Blanchard of Des Moines, Iowa. Burial at New London, Iowa.

      The deceased, who was in his 79th year, was a veteran of the Civil War, a member of the 34th Infantry. He was a long-time member of the Christian church and a member of the Grand Republic. In his family and among his friends, he was known and loved as a man of integrity, a good citizen and a faithful, unpretentious christian. Not a man of many words, he was everywhere recognized as an upright, straightforward citizen. He cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln on a steam on the Mississippi river, while in the service of his country,, and was a lifelong Republican. The flag that rested upon his heart as he was laid away spoke of the simple and sincere devotion of his life.

      He leaves his widow and six children, Sam N., near here; Elvina Frizzell, Garden Grove, Ia., Thomas, at home; Leander, Crawfordsville, Ia., Mrs. Flossie Russell, Wapello (IA), James of Crawfordsville, Ia. He also leaves three sisters and one brother.
    Charles Walker is Buried at Morning Sun
    Charles Walker is Buried at Morning Sun
    A second obituary of Charles Pearsey Walker. Charles Pearsey Walker was a veteran of the Civil War. He died in 1922.
    Obituary  16 Mar 1922  Wapello, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [16
    The Wapello Republican 
    • C. P. Walker

      Charles P. Walker, a highly respected old resident of the Morning Sun community, and a veteran of the Civil War, passed away at his home near there Wednesday, March 8, at the ripe age of 78 years, 10 months, and 25 days.

      C. P. Walker was born in Milton, Wayne county, Indiana, April 13, 1843. He came to Iowa in 1856, locating in Henry county. He was a veteran of the Civil War, having enlisted in the Union army in November 1862, and served until the close of the struggle. He was a member of the 34th Infantry and was present at the siege of Vicksburg and later was at Fort Morgan when Farragut won the blockade and captured the Confederate Ironclad, Tennessee. He was mustered out at Houston, Texas, August 15th, 1865, and discharged September 22nd, 1865.

      He continued to reside in Henry county until 1883 when he went to Texas, returning to Iowa the following year, and locating in Louisa county, where he remained until his death on March 8th, 1922, aged 78 years, 10 months and 25 days.

      He was united in marriage to Miss Ruth E. Fox, July 4th, 1868. Eight children were born to them; Sam N., living on the old home farm near Morning Sun; Everna Frizzell of Garden Grove, Iowa; Thomas, who remained at home and has been the stay and strength of his father in his declining years; Leander of Crawfordsville; Flossie, the wife of John F. Russell of Wapello, and James of Crawfordsville, all of whom were present at the funeral. Two died in infancy. The wife and mother passed away December 1890 [sic: 1889].

      His second marriage was to Mrs. Sarah A. (Houseman) Edgar, July 6th, 1902, [who] with the six children mentioned above; [a total of] twenty grandchildren and seven great grandchildren, survive him.

      One brother, William P., lives in Des Moines; a sister, Mrs. Vashti Edgar, the widow of "Uncle Johnnie" Edgar, one of the pioneers of Henry county, another sister, Mrs. Annie Edgar, residing near New London, Iowa, and still another sister, Mrs. Maggie Vaughn, whose home is near Vantassell, Wyoming, mourn his departure. Only two of his old army comrades of the 34th Iowa Infantry remain - Joe Culver of Garden Grove, Iowa, and Jim Williams of Neosho, Missouri.

      Mr. Walker was a long-time member of the Christian church, as were both his wives. He was also a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. In his family and among his friends he was known and loved as a man of integrity, a good citizen, and a faithful; unpretentious Christian. Not a man of many words, he was everywhere recognized as an upright, straight-forward citizen. He never sought office nor preferment of any kind. He cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln on a steamer on the Mississippi river, while in the service of his country, and was a life-long Republican, loyal at all times to every call of duty and devotion to the flag. The flag that rested upon his heart as he was laid away spoke of the simple and sincere devotion of his life.

      His last illness dated from December and for three months he was cared for with unfailing devotion by his children, who lavished upon him the wealth of their affection that made his last days as comfortable and peaceful as falls to the human lot. All testify to his patience and the Christian faith and fortitude with which he faced death, unafraid and with a simple and beautiful trust. The family and friends that gathered bore witness to the esteem and regard in which this good man and neighbor and friend was held in the community.

      The funeral services were held at the home March 9th, conducted by Charles Blanchard of Des Moines, Iowa, at his request, and burial was made at New London, Iowa.
    Organizations  the GAR (the Grand Army of the Republic)  [16
    Personal Recollection 
    • C.P. Walker
      by Doris Frizzell Cartwright

      The following, regarding my Grandfather, Charles Percy Walker, was told to my family by my Mother, Grandpa's daughter Everna.

      Shortly before his death he called Mother into his room and told her this story;... ...

      After enlisting in the Union army he became very disturbed by the hard drinking of his superior officer. At sometime during that period Grandpa deserted and joined another company as Charles Percy. I do not know when this happened but have a feeling it might have been when he was sent to Chicago from Kansas with rebel prisoners. He received his honorable discharge as Charles Percy.

      He told Mother he had never cashed any of his pension checks, that they were at the back of his closet tied in a red handkerchief. He was afraid it might start an investigation which would embarrass his family. I do not believe they were aware of any of this. I know they didn't know he was not cashing his checks. He told her after he was gone they could do as they wished with the checks. Mother brought them home with her to Garden Grove, Iowa, and with the help of our town lawyer and an old family friend, who was at that time a United States senator, she was able to get the checks cashed and also to obtain a widows pension for our blind Grandma Sally.

      While writing this I began wondering how much pension a Civil War veteran recieved per month. Guess that will be my next project!

      Grandpa died March 8, 1922.
    Probate  20 Apr 1922  Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [37
    The Morning Sun News-Herald 
    • FINDINGS OF DISTRICT COURT.

      [...] The will of Charles P. Walker was admitted of probate April 11th, upon the testimony of W. R. Smyth, M. D., and J. F. Russell, who were witnesses. Mr. Walker died March 8, 1822, in Morning Sun township. His son, Thomas Walker, was nominated by the will as executor.
    Findings of District Court
    Findings of District Court
    A notice that the will of Charles Pearsey Walker had been admitted to probate with his son, Thomas Walker, executor of the estate.
    Research 
    • According to his Civil War records, Charles was 5' 4" in height.
    Religion  the Christian Church.  [16
    Person ID  I211  All Families
    Last Modified  8 Feb 2015 

    Father  Francis Samuel "Sam" Walker,   b. 6 May 1809, Knox County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Mar 1888, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Catharine B. Pearsey,   b. 3 Feb 1805, near the Natural Bridge, Rockbridge County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Sep 1882, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence  Between 1831 and 1856  Milton, Wayne County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [33
    Married  15 Sep 1831  Wayne County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [38, 39
    Officiant 
    • The marriage ceremony of Francis S. Walker and Catherine Pearsey was performed by Benjamin Beeson, the Justice of the Peace.
    Bible 
    • Samuel Walker and Catharine Pearsy were married in Wayne County, Indiana, September 22, 183? (the last number is at a tear in the page)
    Bible 
    • Samuel Francis Walker was born in Knox Co. Tennessee May 4, 1809. [His headstone says May 6 and "Francis Samuel" although he went by the name Sam]

      Catharine Pearsy (sic) Walker was born near the natural bridge Virginia February 3, 1805. [A History of the Pearsey Family lists this as November 3, 1804.]

      Vashti Anne Walker was born Jan 27, 1835, in Milton, Wayne Co, Indiana

      Leander Walker was born Oct 4, 1836, in Milton, Indiana

      Rebecca Walker was born May 4 1838 in Milton, Indiana

      Louvinia Church Walker was born December 1, 1839, in Milton, Indiana

      William Pearsy (sic) Walker was born June 6, 1841, in Milton, Indiana

      Charles Pearsy (sic) Walker was born in Milton, Indiana, April 13, 1843

      Ann Clarinda was born May 15 1846 in Milton, Indiana

      Margaretta Catharine Walker was born Sep 26, ----- [1848] in Milton Indiana

      (A digital scan of this image was provided courtesy of Marge (Kimble) Walker.)
    Religion  1844  [40
    • A history of the Milton Christian Church was published in the book, a History of Wayne County, Indiana, in 1884: Milton Christian Church -- This church was organized chiefly through the labors of elder Samuel K. Hoshour, who preached in Milton for some time prior the organization. The church was formed in May, 1844; [Francis] Samuel Walker was chosen Elder, and John Walker and Thomas Virgin, Deacons. The original members were: James and Catharine Walker, Rachel Griffy, Julian J. Walker, Mary Wallace, Mary A. Doran, Julia A. Griffy, Minerva and Sarah Asher, Jane Mills, Nancy Boggs, Agnes Knipe, Sarah Ritter, Catharine Walker, Mrs. Sarah Asher, Matilda Jones, Richard and Sarah Hubbard, Peter Warren, Henry B. Shull, Elizabeth Warren, Ruth Brown, Caroline Allison, Sarah Virgin, Sarah Shull, Margaret and Nancy Warren, Jane Virgin, Ann Cooper, Susan Walker and Lydia Shank. At first services were held in the school-house and later in the Union church. In the latter worship was held until 1883, when a church edifice was erected at a cost of about $2,500. There are over 100 members. The early pastors were: Elders Hoshour, Benj. Franklin, J. L. Parsons, Daniel Van Buskirk, Henry R. Pritchard, J. B. Irvin and others. The present pastor is Reverend J. M. Land. Present church officers: Elders, Dr. Joel Pennington, Dr. B. M. Witmer; Deacons, Thos. Hunt, J. B. Manlove, Charles Harrison.
    Records of the Walker Family in the First Christian Church in Milton, Indiana
    Records of the Walker Family in the First Christian Church in Milton, Indiana
    The Christian Church was formed in Milton, Indiana, in 1846. Francis Samuel "Sam" Walker was chosen as an elder. Other Walker family members who were listed on the first roster are James Walker (who was born about 1764 and died about 1832), James Walker (born in 1794), John B. Walker, and Julian Jean "Julia Ann" (Welsh) Walker.

    Andrew W. Young, History of Wayne County, Indiana: together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history, portraits of prominent persons, and biographies of representative citizens: history of Indiana and the Northwest Territory, embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, aborigines, Winnebago and Black Hawk wars, and a brief review of its civil, political and military history (originally published by Inter-State Publishing Company, 1884; Chicago, Cook County, Illinois), pages 728 and 729.
    Residence  Between 1856 and 1862  Pleasant Grove Township, Des Moines County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    • Francis and Catherine Walker moved to Iowa in 1856 and lived east of New London in Pleasant Grove Township, Des Moines County, Iowa, until about 1862 when they moved to Baltimore Township, near Lowell, in Henry County, Iowa.
    Residence  1862  Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [41
    • Per information from Sarah Walker in Gentryville, Missouri, written in a letter to her in-laws, Francis and Catherine (Pearsey) Walker were living in New London, Iowa, in 1862.
    Letters and Cards  25 Oct 1862  Gentryville, Gentry County, Missouri Find all individuals with events at this location  [42
    • (This is a letter from Sarah (Lane) Walker to Francis S. and Catharine Walker in New London, Henry County, Iowa:)

      october the 25th gentryville mo

      dear brother and sister and neice and family all

      I take my pen to answer youre letter wich wee received a bout a week a go wee were very glad to here from you and to here that you were well wee are all well am hoping this may find you all enjoying good helth wee are sory to here that sister prudance hardin was sick wee doo hope she has got well long before now i hope leander has got home safe or that you have herd some good news from him before now and I hope the others that have gone to the war are a dooing well my william nelson has got home from corrinth they were brought back to mo(.) to recruit they were brought to st louis the 14th of september they were taken to pilot nobs mo in a day or too after they arived, to hold a fort at rington william nelson was sent up here to recruit he got home the tenth of this month I can't tell you how glad wee were to see him I can't tell you how I felt to meet him and think of my dear george that went away with him that never is to return it is so hard to have our deare children taken from us on account of this wicked rebelion to stand before the deadly weapons of war and siken and dye in hospittles my heart is full of trouble I hope you may not have to feel what I now feel if you remember the last time that I was to see you william nelson was my babe a year old nineteen years ago I had george with mee he was twenty four if he had lived till september the eighth william nelson has had a hard time and was sik a long time and never expected to see home but he got well because he left corrinth he now ways one hundred and seventy too he has such a mean captain i am sory for him he would put him on duty when he could scersely walk or hold up his head he is a drunkard and a irish roman catholick nelson says he will never go through a nother battle for he has herd too many declare vengeance against him part of thare company are of his own kind and he is very partiel to them nelson will have to go soon and I dont no how I will dare to let him go o how I wish this war was over wesly is at lexing[ton] in this state he has been very sik but was a getting better but I am very uneasy about him poor little fellow he is so young to be away in the servis sick I nearly no that henry was in that battle that was fought lately in Kentucky if he was alive and well [wee?] have only one letter from him since he got back to his regiment he was then in Tenessee but has come to Kentucky my son James rote that he had got a letter from henry and he was at louisvill he was well but this battle has bin fought since and wee have got no letter from him and i am so uneasy a bout him i don't no what to doo i am so feard he is killed or wounded for I think wee would have got a letter from him by this time if he was a live and well the trouble that I have seen since this war commenced is a nough to break ones hart o how I dread to here the news our darling sons that wee love so well is so many of them torn from us by the storm of war and when will end wee do not no o how wee all wish it was over I want you to tell all you can about youre boys when you rite where they are and if they have bin in any battle I for got to tell you that wesly had bin in too skrimishes and one battle they said he fought bravely and sent one seesesh to his long that they new of he has bin at home since I talkd (?) him I herd he had killed a reble he said he would not be surprised if he did not kill several he got his hat cut through but come clere him self they killed and wounded over too hundred rebels and lost six killed and a bout twenty wounded the rebles are being drove out of this state though quantril[l] is in the south part of this state in the mountains the paper say he says he is a going to winter thare he may and he may not thare has bin too battles fought neare corinth since wm nelson left thare one at iuka and one at corrinth and price got badly whiped nelson says the rebles cant take corrinth but price thought he would he would try it thar are a great nomber with him that went from here and in diferent parts of this state some have come home and all spring and sumer some of the seesesh were a threatening us with price i suppose they did not no very well where he was some of them had to leave that come back and some got to stay but they have to keep pretty still only when they get by them selvs I suppose they talk as they please about the free negro and the abolision theivs and the amancipation which seem to trouble them so much I believe that if thare had bin no slaves the south would never have rebeld i wish they were all in some country to them selves and let our government bee a free one thoug I will be satisfyed with eny way that goverment may doo if they doo what is best to shorten this war for I doo want it over so bad wm nelsons regiment has to go back to corrinth a gain and i feel like I can't bare to let him go a gain and he hated to go so bad a gain south he only has a few more days to stay at home the time is precious to mee I doo wish wee could see each other, and talk our troubles over. come and see us if you can for wee would bee so glad to see you once more wee are a making our molases wee are nearly done wee will have a bout eighty galon wee have made them nearly in to wax they are very good I am just a going to commence weeving I have twenty six yards of blankets to weeve they are all wool and i have colered them red and blue and black I am a going plad them and twill them I have a short web of flanel and a bout forty yards of janes to weave fifteen is for a nother woman I doo not work since this war commenced like I use to doo for I dont feel like I can for I read and study so much a bout the war and have so much trouble a bout my children tell william hardin wee thought he would rite to us when I rote to him last spring wee would be glad to get a letter from him for that is all the way wee can converse to gether wee got a letter from james a bout five weeks a go they were all well then wee answered it but have not herd from them since sister nancy jackson and sister ana have both lost a son in this war they both live in iowa anas son died in louis vill hospittle last spring nancy jacksons dyed on a boat on his way from heleana she had too sons thare one started home he had got a discharge he died a bout a hundred miles before st louis in august and was brought to st louis and buried my poore loved george lays in missippii his grave was not marked nelson could not find it he was not with him when he dyed for he had to work on the brist(?) works and he could not get to stay with him he could lern nothing a bout him only the general ward master had his name that he dyed the second of July he was to see him on sunday and george told him he was better and wanted to be mooved to camp nelson tryed to have it done but his captain would not have it done on Tusday he was mooved to another hospittle a bout ten miles and died on wensday and and nelson said he hunted through every ward three times and no one could tell him eny thing a bout him only his death was recorded george gave him his mony when he first took sick to take care of he has twenty six dollars and his bounty a comeing yet if wee can get it but is hard to no how to get it I doo hope youre sons may get safe through I want you to rite often and tell all the perticulars aspecialy a bout the boys that are in the army give our love to william hardin and sister prudence tell how meny there are at home of you we only have three children at home with us not counting nelson give our love to sister Jane when you see her tell where she lives and tell where you live wee herd you were a living in new london wee had the first frost here on the tenth of this month it was quite cold last friday and satterday and some few drops of snow on friday crops are good here this yeare wee have plenty of hogs and would have pork to spare if it would sell for what it is worth but I expect thare will be no sale for it I dread this winter for our wood is to haul so far and george has no help only too little boys not old enough to help him much and wee have a poore house to winter in but I hardly ever take eny thought for our selvs for wee have so much trouble a bout our children and a bout the war o that the good lord may take the [cares/curse?] in his own hands and preserve the rite and over through this wicked rebelion shortly is my prais I think that christians should pray mightly to go & (?) for his blesing on our great and good government and for our armys that have perild thare lives to save our country from ruin and woe o that the armys would all put thare trust in isrels god and call on his name with one voice he saved them in anchant days that put thare trust in him and he is the same god yet that he was then wee are a trying to live christians tell how you are a getting a long in the good cause I hope wee will meet in the better land when thare is no war nor no rebelion no seesesh nor traitors where god will wipe all tears from our eyes and wee will be forever blesst wm nelson sends his love to you all if leander has got home give my love to him and tell him to rite tell vestaji (vashti spelled odd?) to rite some i bleive I told you all wee dont have meeting very often the christian church here are nearly all seesesh and what few and dont go often to here them the methodist church is divided too some sessesh and some union and they dont mix to gether much thare is a church a bout too miles and a half from here that are all union nelson was thare to meeting to day and to night they have a good preacher and have a good meeting a going on several have joind George wishes his love sent to you all he scarsely ever rites eny so you must excuse him he thinks he can rite it all rite soon and often so no more at presant but remains yours untill death

      youre friend and well wishes youre sister and aunt sarah walker

      fare well from george and sarah walker to samuel and catherine and neice my love to you all
    A Letter From Sarah (Lane) Walker to Her Brother-in-Law's Family, that of Francis Samuel 'Sam' and Catherine B. (Pearsey) Walker
    A Letter From Sarah (Lane) Walker to Her Brother-in-Law's Family, that of Francis Samuel "Sam" and Catherine B. (Pearsey) Walker
    Sarah Walker was the wife of George W. Walker, who was a brother of Francis S. Walker. George and Sarah lived in Boone and Clinton counties in Indiana before they migrated to Gentryville, Missouri, in 1854. This letter, written October 25, 1862, was about three months after the death of George and Sarah's son, George Washington Walker, who was killed during the Civil War fighting in a battle July 2, 1862, at Corinth, Mississippi. Sarah is overcome with grief, and very afraid for the safety of her other sons who have also gone to war. (The scan of this letter was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    Letters and Cards  1 Mar 1863  [43
    • (A letter from March 1, 1863, sent to Francis Samuel and Catharine (Pearsey) Walker from their nephew, John Wesley Hardin, stationed at Benton Barracks:)

      Dear Uncle and aunt

      I take the present opportunity of pening you a few lines to let you know, that I have not forgoten you yet, I have not got much newes to write to you, but---still I feel it my duty to write some. I am well except a Bad Cold, I have had for a few days. The 4th Regiment of Iowa have came in last night a bout eleven o.clock, I have past a very interesting Day with James Leeas, To day. I received a letter from Leeander a few days a go, which stated he was well. He also says that he is geting to Be a pretty good Black Smith, and is still a learning very fast, I wrote to him I wanted to know how much he was a geting per day. He wrote in his last letter that he did not know how much he was getting yet, he also Stated tath [that] he thought he would Be home the last of June. He wanted me to Be at home also, But I could not say as to that, But I am in hopes that may be the case, things look a little more Honorable(?) than they did some time a go, But still there is a good deal(?) to do yet, there is not many troops in the Barracks as there was some time a go but still there is a few thousand here yet, Well in regard to leaving here I exspect the up there think we will never leave here. But they may get fooled yet for the talk is now that we will leave before long. But I could not say how true it is. But time will tell how it is. But this is a very good place to stay. But the boys want to get out, to see somthing new, well I would like for us to put it through + be don with it there is no use of keeping War on hands so long, it appears to some like the officers wanted make all the money they can out of it. But it may be that I am wrong about this. Well I must quit, write soon I send my best respects to all the family. (?) a big share to you.

      From J. W. Hardin
      To his Uncle Samuel Walker
    A Letter From L 'John' Wesley Hardin to His Uncle and Aunt, Francis Samuel 'Sam' and Catherine B. (Pearsey) Walker
    A Letter From L "John" Wesley Hardin to His Uncle and Aunt, Francis Samuel "Sam" and Catherine B. (Pearsey) Walker
    John Hardin wrote Sam and Catherine Walker from the Benton Barracks in St. Louis, Missouri, on March 1, 1863. The letter mostly contained references to being stationed there and that some of the officers in the army apparently hoped to stretch the war out for as long as possible to earn more money. He also mentioned visiting with a cousin, James W. Leas Apparently this letter was written before his injury or capture by the Confederates. (The scan of this letter was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    Headstone Photograph 
    • The Walker Family monument is at the Ferrel Cemetery in New London Township, Henry County, Iowa. Plot: row 6. The epitaph on the stone is: "Father and Mother. Walker"
    The Walker Family Monument at Ferrel Cemetery
    The Walker Family Monument at Ferrel Cemetery
    Photos
    Brothers Charles Pearsey Walker and William Pearsey Walker
    Brothers Charles Pearsey Walker and William Pearsey Walker
    This photograph, taken between 1918-1922, features Charles Pearsey Walker (1843-1922) on the left, and his older brother, William Pearsey Walker (1841-1924) on the right. In his later years, William, who had settled in Hurdland, Missouri, started to spend the winters in the south, but by 1920 he was apparently unable to do so, and he lived with his daughter's family, that of Wallace and Anna May (Walker) DeLong, in Des Moines, Iowa. In his last years, Charles managed the general store in Morning Sun, Iowa, but in 1920 was still listed as a manager of the home farm on the federal census.
    Documents

    » Slide Show
    A List of Births of the Family of Francis Samuel 'Sam' and Catherine B. (Pearsey) Walker
    A List of Births of the Family of Francis Samuel "Sam" and Catherine B. (Pearsey) Walker
    Recorded entries were made in the family Bible owned by Francis Samuel "Sam" and Catherine B. (Pearsey) Walker. Those listed were "Samuel Francis," "Catharine" Pearsey, Vashti Annie, Leander, Rebecca, "Louvinia" Church, William "Pearsy," Chas. "Pearsy," Ann Clarinda, and Margaretta Catharine Walker.
    A Letter From an Unknown Person to 'Friends'
    A Letter From an Unknown Person to "Friends"
    Marge Kimble provided the scan of this partial letter, written in Winona, Minnesota, March 2, 1856. It apparently was to the family of Francis Samuel "Sam" Walker, but the greeting of the letter is to "Dear Friends." Four pages long, it is not complete. The letter is encouraging further settlement in Minnesota, despite its apparent reputation at the time of being dangerous during the winter months. No family members of the Walker family are known to have settled in Winona or in Minnesota at this time period. (Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Family
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Family
    On December 3, 1862, Charles wrote his family from the mouth of the White River in Arkansas. He mentioned that "Uncle Sam" was getting very much in debt and not paying the army, how much he would like some apples to eat, and that he didn't blame the family for not writing more often, as he knew they were busy (likely a hint). He also sent a photograph of Captain Watters, which he asked his nephew, Charles Francis Walker, to keep until he returned from the war. (The scan of this letter was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Sisters and Niece, Mary Catharine Brewer
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Sisters and Niece, Mary Catharine Brewer
    Charles wrote this letter on May 22, 1863, from Pilot Knob, Missouri, to his sisters and niece. All of his sisters at that time were presumably living at the family farm in Baltimore Township, Henry County, Iowa (Vashti Annie (Walker) Brewer, Lovinia ("Lou") Church, Ann Clarinda, and Margaretta Catharine Walker). He mentions an unknown wedding that will take place, which he cannot attend, also that he sent money home, so he had apparently been paid (another letter dated December 1862 mentioned Uncle Sam was in arrears paying the troops). Apparently he was having some troubles with one of his commanding officers. (The scan of this letter was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Friends During the Siege of Vicksburg
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Friends During the Siege of Vicksburg
    Charles wrote a letter to his "friends," (presumably family since the document was in family hands) from the Siege of Vicksburg, which occurred throughout May and June of 1863. He reported the Union troops had "surrounded the rebels" and were starving them out, food was scarce, dead mules were seen constantly floating down the river, and, judging from the tone of the letter, he was definitely concerned about his own safety. This letter was written in June of 1863, and a later paragraph in it was dated Monday June 15 (which was in 1863). Charles had been in Pilot Knob, Missouri, as recently as May 22, when he wrote another letter home. Parts of this letter are missing. The third page was not scanned and what remains of it that can be read is:

    "[...] how you are [...] and when ? [...] and what Lee is doing [...] present but remain as ever tour son and brother Lo(?) Charles P. Walker.

    Monday 15th - we have moved nearer to the enemy. I got a letter from Wm and Leander today they was well then. I am going to write to them as soon as possible no more at present. Charles P Walker"

    On the back of this letter someone wrote: "Written by C. P. Walker at the siege of Vicksburg, Miss. 1864. Company D 31st Ia. Inf." However, the siege was in 1863 and he was in the 34th Regiment. (The scan of this letter was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. Note: This document is provided in pdf format, except for the third page text above.)
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Sisters
    A Letter From Charles Pearsey Walker to His Sisters
    The final letter from the Civil War that remains in the family archives from Charles Pearsey Walker was written to his sisters September 4, 1863. He was near Carrollton in Orleans Parish, Louisiana. The family had sent him some wedding cake, but it had not fared well sitting at the post office. A family horse, apparently, had contracted tuberculosis. He encouraged his niece, Mary Catharine Brewer, to learn to write, and promised her a pony upon his return. Ulysses S. Grant was going to be there to review the troops, which had apparently become a commonplace occurrence. (The scan of this letter was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    A Letter From Francis Samuel 'Sam' Walker to the Family of Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker
    A Letter From Francis Samuel "Sam" Walker to the Family of Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker
    This letter, written by F. S. Walker to the family of Charles Pearsey Walker, either as they were moving to Texas from Iowa or probably after they had arrived there from Iowa discusses the farm. He mentioned Charles Francis Walker, his grandson, who had remained in Iowa and probably was a big help on the farm. Sam then addresses his grandson, Samuel Nathaniel Walker in the letter, and gives an account of the Walker family and their history, coming from Ireland to Pennsylvania and then to Knoxville, Tennessee. This is particularly useful as he discusses his grandparents' family, and the information matches and extends the information which family historian, Marge Kimble, received in a letter from The Perry Historians (Perry County, Pennsylvania) in 1987. (The scan of this letter was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    A Letter From James Walker (1800-1863) to Francis Samuel 'Sam' Walker and His Family
    A Letter From James Walker (1800-1863) to Francis Samuel "Sam" Walker and His Family
    This letter, dated August 12, 1856, was provided by Marjorie Kimble. It was not in good enough condition for scanning. It was written in Hammondsburg, Iowa, and sent to Francis and his family either in New London, Iowa, or else in Milton, Indiana. They moved to Iowa sometime in about 1856. Apparently they chose to remain in southeast Iowa rather than head to south central Iowa, where James lived. (This document is in .pdf format.)
    Marriage Documentation
    The Marriage Record of Francis Samuel 'Sam' Walker and Catherine B. Pearsey in Their Family Bible
    The Marriage Record of Francis Samuel "Sam" Walker and Catherine B. Pearsey in Their Family Bible
    A record in their family Bible was: "Samuel Walker and Catharine Pearsy were married in Wayne County, Indiana, September 22, 183?" (The last number is at a tear in the page. It was in 1831.)
    Walkers married in Wayne County, Indiana, 1813-1901
    Walkers married in Wayne County, Indiana, 1813-1901
    A list of persons with the Walker surnam married in Wayne County, Indiana, 1813-1901
    Family ID  F151  Group Sheet

    Family 1  Ruth Ellen Fox,   b. 16 Apr 1851, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Dec 1889, Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  4 Jul 1868  Mount Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 45
    Iowa Marriage Records 
    • Groom's Name: Charles Walker; Bride's Name: Ruth E. Fox; Marriage Date: 4 July 1868; Marriage Place:, Henry, Iowa; Indexing Project (Batch) Number: M58826-1; System Origin: Iowa-ODM; Source Film Number: 965926; Collection: Iowa Marriages, 1809-1992
    Marriage Certificate  4 Jul 1868  [47
    • License. No. 68?

      Mr. Charles Walker To Miss Ruth Ellen Fox
      License issued June 20th, 1868. John B. Drayer, County Judge

      State of Iowa, Henry County. --ss:

      I certify that on the 4th day of July, 1868, I did solemnize the Marriage of Mr. Charles Walker and Miss Ruth E. Fox, at the home of the undersigned Mt. Pleasant, in Henry County, Iowa.

      Given under my hand, this 4th day of July 1868. John B. Drayer, County judge, Henry County, Iowa.

      I hereby certify the ? to be a ? copy of the return of the solemnization of Mr. Chalres Walker and Miss Ruth E. Fox as filed in my office, this 4th day of July, 1868. John B. Drayer, County Judge.
    Birth Record 
    • Flossie Zella (Walker) Russell produced a written page of births of the childen in the Charles Pearsey Walker family (with an addition from Marge Kimble). The children listed were Charles Leander "Lee," James G., Flossie Zella, John Henry (J. H.) and Thomas "Tom" Walker. Albert E. Walker, who was born and died in 1876, was not listed on this sheet:

      Chas. Leander Walker born May 8, 1881, at New London, Iowa.

      James G. Walker [... nothing more]

      Flossie Z. Walker, born April 13, 1884, at Tehncana, Texas.

      James G. Walker (redux), born January 19, 1887, at Morning Sun, Iowa.

      J. H., born November 14, 1889, Morning Sun.

      (The addition by Marge Kimble:) Tom Walker, November 12, 1877.
    Residence  Abt 1868/1869  Nebraska Find all individuals with events at this location  [25
    • Possibly they moved there because other members of Ruth Ellen's sister's family, that of Elizabeth (Fox) Sampson, had moved there.
    Residence  Between 1869 and 1883  Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    • Charles and family lived in a "log cabin" north of New London, between New London and Mt. Union.
    Residence  Between 1883 and 1884  Tehuacana, Limestone County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3
    • Daughter Flossie Walker was born during the stay in Texas.
    Death Record  Flossie Russell Deaths' List  [25
    • Flossie Zella (Walker) Russell produced a written page of deaths of the family of Charles Pearsey Walker before she died in 1968, probably before 1973 when her brother James died, as he was not listed:

      Ruth Ellen Walker, December 29, 1889, at Morning Sun, Iowa

      Albert E. Walker, died [in] 1876.

      J. H. Walker, died February 13, 1890.
    Headstone Photograph 
    • Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker's grave is located at the Ferrel Cemetery near New London, Henry County, Iowa. The epitaph on the stone is: "Charles P. Walker, April 13, 1843 - March 8, 1922; Ruth E. His Wife, April 16, 1861 - December 29, 1889."
    The Headstone of Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker
    The Headstone of Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker
    Children 
    >1. Samuel Nathaniel "Sam" Walker,   b. 24 Jul 1869, a log house two miles north of New London, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Mar 1957, Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location
    >2. Everna Ida "Vernie" Walker,   b. 27 Apr 1873, a log house two miles north of New London, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Apr 1951, Weldon, Decatur County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Albert E. Walker,   b. 15 Jan 1876, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Nov 1876, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Thomas "Tom" Walker,   b. 2 Nov 1877, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Nov 1968, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location
    >5. Charles Leander "Lee" Walker,   b. 8 May 1881, New London, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Oct 1968, Crawfordsville, Washington County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location
    >6. Flossie Zella Walker,   b. 18 Apr 1884, Tehuacana, Limestone County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jun 1968, Wapello Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, Wapello, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. James G. "Jim" Walker,   b. 19 Jan 1887, Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1 Sep 1973, Mount Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location
     8. John H. Walker,   b. 14 Nov 1889, Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Feb 1890, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location
    Photos

    » Slide Show
    The Family of Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker, and Charles Francis Walker
    The Family of Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker, and Charles Francis Walker
    This photograph is the only known photo of Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker and the only photograph (I have) of Charles Francis Walker. It was taken most likely in 1882; no later than 1883. Charles Leander "Lee" Walker, sitting on Charles Pearsey Walker's lap, was born May 1881. Flossie Zella Walker, the next child born to Charles and Ruth, was born in April 1884, when the family was living in Texas for a year (obviously she is not pictured), and Charles F. Walker remained with Francis S. Walker on the family farm when Charles and Ruth and their family were in Texas.

    Despite what the writing on this photo says about Charles F. being an orphan, his father, Leander Walker, Charles Pearsey Walker's brother, was alive and living in Indiana when this photograph was taken. Leander's first wife, Olive née Walker (unrelated), died when Charles Francis was an infant; Leander sent his son to Iowa to be raised by the family. Leander remarried later and had three more sons.

    Identification is as follows: Everna Ida "Vernie" Walker (later Frizzell) is standing on the left, Charles Pearsey Walker is sitting, holding Charles Leander "Lee" Walker on his lap. Charles Francis is standing to their left. Standing alone in front is Thomas "Tom" Walker, then Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker, and standing on the right is Samuel Nathaniel "Sam" Walker. This photograph was provided courtesy of Marge Kimble. It was in Flossie Russell's family archives.
    The Charles Pearsey Walker Family (Original Page)
    The Charles Pearsey Walker Family (Original Page)
    This is a page with the photo of Charles Pearsey Walker's family on it. Apparently Flossie Zella (Walker) Russell wrote the notes on the page, which are: "Parents - Ruth and Charlie Walker. Everna standing by Dad. Charles Leander on lap. Tom along side. Older boys Sam & Charlie Walker, nephew - their father died (sic: mother) so they came to stay with CP and Ruth."

    I theorize this was a family photograph left to relatives about the time when Charles, Ruth, and their children moved to Texas for several years (Charles Francis remained behind, living with Francis S. and Catherine B. (Pearsey) Walker.
    Charles Pearsey Walker and His Daughter, Everna Ida 'Vernie' (Walker Frizzell
    Charles Pearsey Walker and His Daughter, Everna Ida "Vernie" (Walker Frizzell
    Charles and Vernie were having a visit while she was pregnant. This likely was between 1911-1913.
    Flossie Zella Russell and her Sister, Everna Ida 'Vernie' Frizzell
    Flossie Zella Russell and her Sister, Everna Ida "Vernie" Frizzell
    This photograph from between about 1915/20 is of the two daughters of Charles Pearsey Walker and Ruth Ellen Fox: Flossie Russell (1884-1968), who lived in Wapello, Iowa, married to John Franklin Russell (1882-1967) and Vernie Frizzell, (1873-1951), who married Elijah C. "Eli" Frizzell (1863-1934). Vernie lived in Clarke County, Iowa.
    Sisters 'Vernie' Frizzell and Flossie Russell
    Sisters "Vernie" Frizzell and Flossie Russell
    My grandaunts, Everna Ida "Vernie" (Walker) Frizzell and Flossie Zella (Walker) Russell were enjoying a reunion or visit when this photograph was taken in about 1945. Vernie lived in Clarke County, Iowa, in the south central part of the state, and Flossie in Louisa County, Iowa, a county on the Mississippi River in the eastern part of the state.
    The Children of Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker in About 1950
    The Children of Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker in About 1950
    These were the surviving children of the family of Charles and Ruth Walker of Henry County, Iowa, Texas, and later Louisa County, Iowa. Left to right are: James G. "Jim" Walker (1887-1973), Thomas "Tom" Walker (1877-1968), Everna Ida "Vernie" (Walker) Frizzell (1873-1951), Flossie Zella (Walker) Russell (1883-1968), and (my own grandfather) Samuel Nathaniel "Sam" Walker (1869-1957).
    Walker Siblings - Tom, Sam, Jim, and Flossie Russell
    Walker Siblings - Tom, Sam, Jim, and Flossie Russell
    This photograph taken by Samuel Nathaniel "Sam" and Jennie "Reil" (Hannah) Walker's house in Morning Sun Iowa is of four of the five living Walker children at that time in 1956, left-to-right: Thomas "Tom" Walker, Sam, James G. "Jim" Walker, and Flossie Zella (Russell) Walker.
    Documents

    » Slide Show
    A List of Births of the Family of Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker
    A List of Births of the Family of Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker
    Flossie Zella (Walker) Russell produced a written page of births of the childen in the Charles Pearsey Walker family (with an addition from Marge Kimble). The children listed were Charles Leander "Lee," James G., Flossie Zella, John Henry (J. H.) and Thomas "Tom" Walker. Albert E. Walker, who was born and died in 1876, was not listed on this sheet.
    A List of Deaths of the Family of Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker
    A List of Deaths of the Family of Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker
    Flossie Zella (Walker) Russell produced a written page of family deaths of her parents' family, that of Charles Pearsey Walker and Ruth Ellen (Fox) Walker. The list was probably created before 1973 when her brother James died, as he is not listed.
    Antiquity to Modern: 65 Generations
    Antiquity to Modern: 65 Generations
    This is a document featuring 65 generations of descendants of Godwulf (born circa AD 80) to Dennis Brumm. Through the Fox family genealogy, much of which was provided by researcher Jodie Streit, plus some research I did backing it out from the royal family of England (to which the Fox family is connected, including Norse legends which can never be proven, this is the furthest back my database goes. It is not posted to be taken as "fact" in the earliest of generations/ (Note: this document is in .pdf format.)
    Histories
    A Personal Story Told to Doris Daisy (Frizzell) Cartwright By Her Mother Everna Ida 'Vernie' (Walker) Frizzell
    A Personal Story Told to Doris Daisy (Frizzell) Cartwright By Her Mother Everna Ida "Vernie" (Walker) Frizzell
    Doris Cartwright furnished a typewritten page explaining that her mother, Vernie Frizzell, had been told by her grandfather, Charles Pearsey Walker, that he'd never cashed his pension checks because of a desertion during the Civil War.
    The Biography of Charles Pearsey Walker (1843-1922)
    The Biography of Charles Pearsey Walker (1843-1922)
    Arthur Springer, Louisa County History - Louisa County, Iowa (published in 1912 by S. J. Clark Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois), pages 549-550.
    Marriage Documentation
    The Marriage Record of Charles Pearsey Walker and Ruth Ellen Fox
    The Marriage Record of Charles Pearsey Walker and Ruth Ellen Fox
    Charles and Ruth were married July 4, 1868, at the home of County Judge, John B. Drayer, in Mount Pleasant, Iowa.
    Last Modified  28 Feb 2014 
    Family ID  F8  Group Sheet

    Family 2  Sarah Ann "Sally" Houseman,   b. 8 Sep 1848, Mount Pleasant, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jul 1941, Gulfport, Harrison County, Mississippi Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  6 Jul 1902  home of Sarah Ann (Houseman) Edgar, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 49, 50
    Marriage Certificate  6 Jul 1902  [47
    • Certificate of Marriage

      This Certifies, That on the 6 day of June 1902, at __ in Henry County, Iowa, according to law, and by authority and license under the seal of the District Court, I duly JOINED IN MARRIAGE

      Charles Walker and Mrs. Sarah Edger, Given under my hand this Sixth day of July 1902.

      MARRIAGE SOLEMNIZED IN PRESENCE OF
      William Edger, John Edger, Witnesses
      Ernest L. Coons, Minister
    Officiant 
    • Charles and Sarah's wedding was officiated by Ernest L. Coons, Minister.
    Marriage Announcement  10 Jul 1902  Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [50
    The Morning Sun News-Herald 
    • Local Items

      C. P. Walker, who lives east of this city, was married a few days ago to Mrs. Sarah Edger, at the bride's borne near New London, Reverend E. L. Coons of Burlington, officiating. Mr. Walker's friends extend congratulations.
    Letters and Cards  9 Feb 1911  New London, Henry County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [51
    • New London, Iowa
      February 9, 1911 8 p.m.

      To: Mr. Charles P. Walker
      Morning Sun, Iowa

      New London Iowa January (sic) 8, 1911

      Dear Brother and Sister and all was glad to hear from you. Sorry to hear of James being sick. Hope he will be better when this reaches you. With Love, Ann Edgar.
    Photographic Record  1915/1920  near Newport, Louisa County, Iowa Find all individuals with events at this location  [25
    • A photograph exists (scanned copy provided courtesy of Marge (Walker) Kimble) of aged members of the family consisting of Charles Pearsey Walker with his second wife, Sarah (Houseman/Edgar) Walker, and two sisters, Ann Clarinda (Walker) Edgar, and Vashti Annie (Walker/Brewer) Edger. It was probably taken sometime between 1915/1920. In the background is the "Walker Homestead," the house owned by Charles. By this time his son's family, that of Samuel Nathaniel Walker, was living in the family home, and Charles and Sarah resided in another house on the farm. Vashti was living with her granddaughter's family, that of Mrs. Albert Hartman, and Ann Clarinda Edgar lived on her family farm near New London, Iowa.
    Photos

    » Slide Show
    Charles Pearsey Walker, His Wife, Sarah Walker, and Sisters Vashti Edger and Ann Edgar
    Charles Pearsey Walker, His Wife, Sarah Walker, and Sisters Vashti Edger and Ann Edgar
    This photograph, taken in possibly 1916, is of Charles Pearsey Walker with two of his sisters and his second wife, Sarah Ann "Sally" (Houseman/Edgar) Walker. Left to right the women are Ann Clarinda (Walker) Edgar, Sarah Walker, and Vashti Annie (Walker/Brewer) Edger.
    1912 Walker Family Photos: Charles Pearsey Walker's Second Home Near Newport
    1912 Walker Family Photos: Charles Pearsey Walker's Second Home Near Newport
    When Sam Walker moved into his father's farm home, Charles P. Walker moved to a second house that was on the property. He lived there with his second wife, Sarah Ann "Sally" (Houseman/Edgar) Walker. In this photograph Sam, his wife and three children are visiting Charles and Sally. It was probably taken the same day as the photograph of the Moyers and Walkers who were in a canoe on a pond at the farm.

    Left to right: Hattie Mae (Moyers) Walker, holding Hattie "Leota" Walker, Zella "Myrtle" Walker, Charles Pearsey Walker (standing, porting a beard which is seen in other photographs of this time), Sarah, known as "Aunt Sallie" Walker, sitting in her chair, and father Samuel Nathaniel "Sam" Walker holding the hands of his two youngest sons at the time, Paul Moyers Walker, and Samuel Clinton "Sam" Walker (it is unclear which might be which). Marge Kimble kindly provided this photograph.
    Walker Women and a Moyers - Three Generations
    Walker Women and a Moyers - Three Generations
    This photograph ports three generations of Walker family women and or three generations of Moyers women, depending upon once reference. Standing in the rear left is Myrtle (Zella "Myrtle"), the baby is her sister, Ruth Rebecca, next is their mother, Harriett (Hattie Mae (Moyers)), with her mother, Rebecca Moyers next to her (Rebecca (Pence)) and Harriett's daughter, Maude (Maude Mae) on the right. Seated is "Aunt Sallie," (Sarah Ann "Sally" (Houseman/Edgar) Walker), the step-mother-in-law of Harriett, the second wife of Charles Pearsey Walker. The little girl in the front was my mother, Leota (Hattie "Leota"), another daughter of Hattie Mae (Moyers) Walker.

    Ruth was born in 1915. This photograph was probably taken during the summer of 1916.
    A Map of the Area With the 'Walker Homestead' in Louisa County, Iowa
    A Map of the Area With the "Walker Homestead" in Louisa County, Iowa
    The "Walker Homestead" refers to the home built by Samuel Dotson (1858-1931) for Charles Pearsey Walker and his second wife, Sarah Ann (Houseman/Edgar) Walker, finished in 1903. The small village of Newport is a few miles southeast of where the home was. Samuel Nathaniel Walker and his families lived there as well until the 1930s. The house was torn down, probably in the 1960s or at the latest in the 1970s.
    Documents

    » Slide Show
    A Birthday Card on October 20, 1910 (front)
    A Birthday Card on October 20, 1910 (front)
    From Charles Pearsey and Sarah Walker to Eli Frizzell. The picture is of two doves or pigeons with crests, a very nice birdhouse and is surrounded by green and red foliage.
    A Birthday Card on October 20, 1910 (back)
    A Birthday Card on October 20, 1910 (back)
    From Charles Pearsey and Sarah Walker in Morning Sun, Iowa, to Eli Frizzell in Osceola, Iowa. On the top of the back of the card is written "W.O. 1210908, C.P.Walker" On the bottom of the card is written in a different pen, "Sample of Soldier Writing." This apparently was used to cash Charles Pearsey Walker's pension checks which he feared to cash when he was alive. The message on the card is, "Dear son, Hope you may have many more birth day (sic) and all your life may be filled with health happiness and prosperity, and that you will never forget your God who is the keeper of your soul. Affectionately, C. P. and S. A. Walker.
    A Postcard on February 9, 1911 (front)
    A Postcard on February 9, 1911 (front)
    From Ann Clarinda (Walker) Edgar to Charles Pearsey Walker. There is a snowy scene with lone house and a boat sitting atop a frozen lake. Written on the card is, "Rest Haven"
    A Postcard on February 9, 1911 (back)
    A Postcard on February 9, 1911 (back)
    From Ann Clarinda (Walker) Edgar in New London, Iowa, to her brother and sister-in-law (x2) and family, Charles Pearsey and Sarah Ann "Sally (Houseman/Edgar) Walker in Morning Sun, Iowa. The message is, "New London, Ia., Jan. 8 (sic: postmark is February 9), 1911. Dear Brother and Sister and all was glad to hear from you. Sorry to hear of James being sick. hope he will be better when this reaches you. With Love, Ann Edger."
    Marriage Documentation
    The Marriage Certificate of Charles Pearsey Walker and Sarah Ann (Houseman) Edgar
    The Marriage Certificate of Charles Pearsey Walker and Sarah Ann (Houseman) Edgar
    Charles and Sarah were married July 6, 1902, at her home in rural New London, Henry County, Iowa.
    The Marriage Announcement of Charles Pearsey Walker and Sarah Ann (Houseman) Edger
    The Marriage Announcement of Charles Pearsey Walker and Sarah Ann (Houseman) Edger
    Charles and Sarah were married July 6, 1902, at the home of Sarah Ann (Houseman) Edgar in Henry County, Iowa.
    Last Modified  28 Feb 2014 
    Family ID  F150  Group Sheet

  • Photos

    » Slide Show
    Charles Pearsey Walker
    Charles Pearsey Walker
    Charles Pearsey Walker was the youngest son of Francis Samuel "Sam" and Catherine B. (Pearsey) Walker. Two sisters were younger than he. Charles was born in Milton, Indiana, and moved to southeast Iowa in about 1855 with his parents and family. Other extended family members already lived there. In Iowa he met Ruth Ellen Fox, the daughter of Nathaniel and Kitturah (McFarland) Fox. He married her, and they had eight children, two of whom died as infants. Their oldest son was Samuel Nathaniel "Sam" Walker, who is my grandfather. The other children were: Everna Ida "Vernie" Frizzell, sons Albert E., Thomas "Tom,"and Charles Leander "Lee" Walker, Flossie Zella Russell, and sons James G. "Jim" and John H. Walker.
    Charles Pearsey Walker, Civil War Photograph
    Charles Pearsey Walker, Civil War Photograph
    Charles Pearsey Walker was the son of Francis Samuel "Sam" and Catherine B. (Pearsey) Walker. He was the father of Samuel Nathaniel "Sam" Walker, Everna Ida "Vernie" (Walker) Frizzell, Charles Leander "Lee" Walker, James G. "Jim" Walker, Thomas "Tom" Walker, Flossie Zella (Walker) Russell, and two children who died in infancy, Albert E. and John H. Walker.

    This photo of Charles P. Walker was taken during his term of service in the Civil War. According to family genealogist cousin, Patrick Pearsey, this is a carte de visite photograph, and probably can be dated to approximately 1861, but as Charles didn't enlist until 1862, it more likely was taken that year.

    Charles was born in 1843 and he does appear to be about 20 in the photo.

    Charles was born in Milton, Indiana, on April 13, 1843. He was 13 years old when the family moved to Henry County, Iowa. As a teenager he apparently worked as a farm hand in Des Moines County, Iowa, for a few years.

    When he first enlisted in the service he had a disagreement with a commanding officer and deserted. Charles' father, Francis, was most distraught about this so Charles re-enlisted and, fearing reprisals for his earlier desertion, used his middle name, Pearsey, as his last name throughout his term of service. Charles was in the 34th Iowa Infantry (made up mostly of men from south central Iowa).
    The Back of Charles Pearsey Walker's Soldier Photograph
    The Back of Charles Pearsey Walker's Soldier Photograph
    This is the back side of the photograph of Charles Pearsey Walker during the Civil War. The two-penny stamp was a tax on photos that the northern government used to pay for the war effort, a practice that existed between 1864-1866. According to an online source, 'An act of Congress passed on June 30, 1864, added a new tax on all "photographs, ambrotypes, daguerreotypes or any other sun-pictures," to be paid for by attaching a revenue stamp on the back of the photograph. The tax was set at 2 cents for a photograph "with a retail value of not over 25 cents, 3 cents for a photo costing over 25 cents but not over 50 cents; 55 cents for photos costing over 50 cents but not over a dollar; and for each additional dollar or fraction of a dollar, another 5 cents.'
    Charles Pearsey Walker Picking Grapes
    Charles Pearsey Walker Picking Grapes
    C. P. Walker, my great grandfather, lived from 1843-1922. This photograph of him picking grapes was probably taken in the last few years of his life. His second wife, Sarah "Sallie" (Houseman/Edgar) Walker lived with him, as did Charles's son, Thomas "Tom" Walker.
    Anderson Gartin (Maternal Families)
    Anderson Gartin (Maternal Families)
    This photograph, which was in a collection of Civil War soldiers that my great grandfather, Charles Pearsey Walker, mailed back home to New London, Iowa, has the name of the soldier, Anderson Gartin, on both the front and back. A quick search online for "Anderson Gartin," not the most common name, returned this information from Who's Who in Nebraska - Franklin County:

    GARTIN, JESSE BURR: Merchant; born in Ringgold County, Iowa, July 16, 1881; son of Anderson Gartin and Catherine Selders; ed Neb; married Minnie Kirste February 4, 1913 [in] Beaver City; S Laverne, Dean; 1900-01 employed in drug store, Ashland Oregon; 1901-13 employed in various vocations; 1913-18 owned & operated [a] butcher shop, Danbury; 1918- owner & operator [of a] creamery, grocery store, ice & cold storage bus, Franklin; member [of the] school board 15 years; AF&AM 264, past master; York Rite; KT; Meth Ch; Rep; res Franklin.

    I also received the following email from one of Mr. Gartin's descendants, Mr. Pete Remster:

    "The person in the photograph, Anderson Gartin, was the son of Felix and Phoebe (Myers) Gartin. He was born in 1848 in Fulton County, Indiana, moved to Lucas County, Iowa, with his parents and several other family members (including my great grandfather, Charles W. Gartin, Co 'C' 13th Iowa Infantry, and his family, who was Anderson's uncle. Anderson served in the 34th Iowa Volunteers, Co 'E' from August 9, 1862 until August 15, 1865, when he was discharged in Houston, Texas. His rating was as a private (Fifer). He was 5 feet 9 inches tall, blue eyes, and light hair. After his discharge he moved to Danbury, Red Willow County, Nebraska. He and his wife, Charlotte Catherine Selders, are buried in the cemetery east of Danbury. They were married November 17, 1868, in Lucas County, Iowa, by Reverend R. J. David."

    Anderson had brothers Griffith Gartin (Co "C" 13th Iowa), George W. Gartin (Co "C" 13th Iowa) and Charles Felix Gartin (Co "K" 46th Iowa).

    The back of the card says "Freedom, Lucas Co., Iowa"
    George H. Stults (Maternal Families)
    George H. Stults (Maternal Families)
    Although the writing is very difficult to read on this photograph, it is "George H. Stults," which is the name of the man in the picture. George was in Company "A" of the Iowa 34th Regiment, which consisted mostly of recruits from Decatur County, Iowa. The 34th Iowa was also Charles Pearsey Walker's Regiment; George was apparently a good friend. According to a letter from the Civil War that Charles wrote home, he occasionally sent back photos of his friends with instructions for his family to keep them until the war's end.
    Four Generations of 'Walkers'
    Four Generations of "Walkers"
    Thelma Verlee Umphrey was the baby in this photograph probably taken in summer of 1917. She is being held by her grandfather, Samuel Nathaniel "Sam" Walker. Her mother, standing between the men, was Maude Mae (Walker) Umphrey. And Thelma's grandfather, Charles Pearsey Walker, was standing on the right of the photograph.
    Members of the Family of Marjorie Naomi "Marge" (Walker) Kimble Who Served in the Armed Forces
    This photograph is of the window of the local newspaper in Morning Sun, Iowa, The Morning Sun News-Herald, during Veterans Day festivities in 2010. Marge Kimble works in the office of the paper, and put up this memorial to various family members who had served in the U.S. Armed Forces throughout the years.

    Upper row, her son, Trevor Motzart Kimble Jr., George Percy Walker (1896-1985), William David "Bill" Walker (1918-1977). Bottom row: Paul Moyers Walker (1904-1959), Charles Pearsey Walker (1843-1922), John Henry Walker (1924-1944), and Trevor Motzart Kimble Sr. (1926-1996). (At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.)

    Documents

    » Slide Show
    A Plat Map from the 19th Century Showing the Vicinity of New London, Henry County, Iowa
    A Plat Map from the 19th Century Showing the Vicinity of New London, Henry County, Iowa
    Two landowners on this map were Charles Pearsey Walker and his father-in-law, Nathaniel Fox. The map can be dated to about 1870. After 1883 Charles Walker and family left the county.
    A Plat Map of Part of Louisa County, Iowa, 1899/1900
    A Plat Map of Part of Louisa County, Iowa, 1899/1900
    Many noted Louisa County farmers owned land and are listed on this plat map from 1899/1900. The Walker landowners on the map are Charles Pearsey, William Pearsey, and Charles Francis Walker.

    Other surnames noted on the plat map which have interconnections to this database include: Harris, Meyerholz, Poggemiller (Pogemiller), Small, Umphrey, Deihl, Hamilton McCullough, Dotson, Jamison, Baird, Swan, Delzell, Hewitt, and Springsteen.
    A Postcard on February 17, 1910 (front)
    A Postcard on February 17, 1910 (front)
    From Helen May Frizzell to Charles Pearsey Walker. The message is, "Best Wishes"
    A Postcard on February 17, 1910 (back)
    A Postcard on February 17, 1910 (back)
    From Helen May Frizzell in Woodburn, Iowa, to her grandfather, Charles Pearsey Walker in Morning Sun, Iowa. The message is, "Your granddaughter, Helen Frizzell. Dear Grandpa, How are you folks? We are all well and hope you are the same. Excus poor wrighting I am in a hurry. Tell Uncle Tom to come."
    A Birthday Card on April 5, 1915 (front)
    A Birthday Card on April 5, 1915 (front)
    From Bertha Belle (Eddingfield) Edger to Charles Pearsey Walker. The message is, "Birthday Greetings"
    A Birthday Card on April 5, 1915 (back)
    A Birthday Card on April 5, 1915 (back)
    From Bertha Belle (Eddingfield) Edger in New London, Iowa, to Charles Pearsey Walker in Morning Sun, Iowa (his birthday was Tuesday, April 13). The message is, "Monday Morning: - Received your card about the eggs. Will have them by the last of the wk. if nothing happens. Art will try to bring them and Jamie out. Hope you are all well. Love to all, Bertha E."
    A Birthday Card on April 15, 1916 (front)
    A Birthday Card on April 15, 1916 (front)
    From Everna Ida "Vernie" (Walker) Frizzell to Charles Pearsey Walker. The message is, "A Happy Birthday. This day so especially thine, Is very dear to me. I wish thee every happiness, And all prosperity."
    A Birthday Card on April 15, 1916 (back)
    A Birthday Card on April 15, 1916 (back)
    From Everna Ida "Vernie" (Walker) Frizzell in Woodburn, Iowa, to her father, Charles Pearsey Walker in Morning Sun, Iowa, whose birthday was Thursday, April 13. The message is, "Dear Father, I will send this so you may know I did not forget your birthday and to wish you many more happy ones. We are all well but one - and maybe I just got a habit of complaining but seems like I can't stand it to work this spring. I have 17 (171?) chickens ought too had 300 if they had hatched good. Eli got pasture for his cattle give $3.00 per acre or rather $330 for 116 acres. How is Tom's pigs we haven't any sows this yr. We have 8 little calves. Tell Sallie I wish she could hear Charles singing this A.M. With Love, E. F."
    A Postcard on June 1, 1916 (front)
    A Postcard on June 1, 1916 (front)
    From Ann Clarinda Edger to Charles Pearsey Walker. The photo is of the Central Fire and Police Station in Burlington. A horse drawn wagon appears to be pulling a load of lumber.
    A Postcard on June 1, 1916 (back)
    A Postcard on June 1, 1916 (back)
    From Ann Clarinda Edger staying Burlington, Iowa, to Charles Pearsey Walker at RFD 2 in Morning Sun, Iowa. The message is: "Burlington, Iowa, June 1, '16; 1913 Miller; Dear brother, Please meet me Monday in Morning Sun. I will come on the afternoon train. I want to see you folks and C. F. too. I am on business. Came from (New) London yesterday. All well good as ever. Your loving sister C. A. Edger."
    A Postcard on August 30, 1918 (front)
    A Postcard on August 30, 1918 (front)
    From James G. Walker to Charles Pearsey Walker. The message is, "Steamer 'C. W. Morse,' Hudson River, N.Y."
    A Postcard on August 30, 1918 (back)
    A Postcard on August 30, 1918 (back)
    From James G. Walker in an undisclosed location during World War I, to his father, Charles Pearsey Walker in Morning Sun, Iowa. The message is, "From: Jim. We are moveing again. don't know where we are going, but are on our way. You probly won't heare from me for some time as we may not yet [be] settled down for awhile. Am still feeling fine and enjoying life. Jim"
    A Birthday Card on April 13, 1920 (front)
    A Birthday Card on April 13, 1920 (front)
    From Elsie Walker to Charles Pearsey Walker. There is an idyllic tree picture with the tree next to a lake or river, and a message that is "Birthday Greetings; Though we are far apart, you're just as dear to me, you always will until the end my well beloved be."
    A Birthday Card on April 13, 1920 (back)
    A Birthday Card on April 13, 1920 (back)
    From Elsie Walker in Greenup, Illinois, to Charles Pearsey Walker in Morning Sun, Iowa. The message is, "Greenup, Illinois, April 11, 1920, Dear Grandpa: Hope this finds you well too. We have been having lots of rain. The farmers haven't been able to sow any oats yet. Haven't seen much sunshine down here since coming here last fall. Guess it will soon be hot enough though. Love to Uncle Tom, Grandma and yourself. Your granddaughter, Elsie W."
    Grand Army of the Republic Posts in Iowa in 1889
    Grand Army of the Republic Posts in Iowa in 1889
    The G.A.R. was an influential organization comprised of Union veterans after the Civil War. This lists of outposts in Iowa was current as of 1889, some 24 years after the war's end

    General Newsprint
    Two Newspaper Photos from the G.A.R. Encampment, September 17-22, 1933
    Two Newspaper Photos from the G.A.R. Encampment, September 17-22, 1933
    The Grand Army of the Republic was the organization made up of Civil War veterans from the Union side after the Civil War. Their first encampment was in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 1866. The last one was in 1949. In 1933 the encampment took place in St. Paul, Minnesota, and these photographs were published, probably in a local southeast Iowa newspaper, and provided courtesy of Marge Kimble.

    Obituaries, Deaths, Funerals
    The Funeral Program of Charles Pearsey Walker
    The Funeral Program of Charles Pearsey Walker
    The funeral program for Charles Pearsey Walker was published by H. F. Wendell, Leipsic, Ohio.
    The Obituary of Charles Pearsey Walker
    The Obituary of Charles Pearsey Walker
    Charles Pearsey Walker was buried at Ferrel Cemetery near New London, Iowa. His first wife, Ruth Ellen, was buried there as well after her early death.

  • Sources 
    1. [S27] Kimble, Marjorie Naomi "Marge" (Walker) (Reliability: 4).

    2. [S30] Louisa County, Iowa - Louisa County History 1911, Arthur Springer, (The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1911, Chicago, Illinois), pages 110-111 (Reliability: 3).

    3. [S30] Louisa County, Iowa - Louisa County History 1911, Arthur Springer, (The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1911, Chicago, Illinois), pages 549-550 (Reliability: 4).

    4. [S49] Walker, Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) - Headstone Photograph, (their grave is at the Ferrel Cemetery, New London Township, Henry County, Iowa; photograph provided courtesy of Marjorie Naomi "Marge" (Walker) Kimble) (Reliability: 4).

    5. [S8089] New London Township, Henry County, Iowa - Burials (Brooks, Farlow, and Ferrel Cemeteries), (published by the Iowa Genealogical Society, 1987, publication #0336; Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa) (Reliability: 3).

    6. [S366] 1850 US Census (Reliability: 2).
      Page Number: 595 298, Washinton Township, Wayne County, Indiana; enumerated on July 29, 1850

    7. [S451] 1860 US Census (Reliability: 3).
      Page Number: 160, Sheet Number: 953, Pleasant Grove Township, Des Moines County, Iowa; Post Office: New London; enumerated on July 18, 1860

    8. [S8157] Walker, Charles Pearsey - Letter 1862/09/06 to Francis Samuel "Sam" Walker, (September 6, 1862) (Reliability: 4).

    9. [S8155] Walker, Charles Pearsey - Military Records (Reliability: 4).

    10. [S8158] Walker, Charles Pearsey - Letter 1862/12/03 to Family, (December 3, 1862) (Reliability: 4).

    11. [S27] Kimble, Marjorie Naomi "Marge" (Walker) (Reliability: 4).
      Scan of the letter fragments accomplished by Marge Kimble.

    12. [S8160] Walker, Charles Pearsey - Letter 1863 to Family During the Siege of Vicksburg, (1863) (Reliability: 4).

    13. [S8159] Walker, Charles Pearsey - Letter 1863/05/22 to His Sisters and Niece (Reliability: 4).

    14. [S8161] Walker, Charles Pearsey - Letter 1863/09/04 to Family From Carrolton, Louisiana (Reliability: 4).

    15. [S27] Kimble, Marjorie Naomi "Marge" (Walker) (Reliability: 4).
      From "A Louisa County History"

    16. [S370] Walker, Charles Pearsey - Obituary (Wapello Republican), (originally published in The Wapello Republican, March 16, 1922; Wapello, Louisa County, Iowa) (Reliability: 4).

    17. [S267] 1870 US Census (Reliability: 3).
      Page Number: 8, New London Township, Henry County, Iowa; Sheet 282, Post Office: Mount Pleasant; enumerated on July 16, 1870

    18. [S27] Kimble, Marjorie Naomi "Marge" (Walker) (Reliability: 3).
      Scanned image of loan and final payment from Marge Kimble.

    19. [S628] 1880 US Census (Reliability: 4).
      New London Township, Henry County, Iowa; Page 5, Supervisor's District 1, Enumeration District 97, Sheet 353A; Enumerated on June 3 and 4, 1880

    20. [S929] 1885 Iowa State Census (Reliability: 3).
      Morning Sun Township, Louisa County, Iowa, page 300, Roll: IA1885_222

    21. [S8162] Walker, Charles Pearsey - D.H. Morrison Statement of Account 1888/05/26, (May 26, 1888) (Reliability: 4).

    22. [S8163] Walker, Charles Pearsey - D.H. Morrison Statement of Account 1888/10/31, (October 31, 1888) (Reliability: 4).

    23. [S29] 1895 Iowa State Census (Reliability: 4).
      Morning Sun Township; Sutro Library, San Francisco, Census Microfilm.

    24. [S54] 1900 US Census (Reliability: 4).
      Morning Sun Township, Louisa County, Iowa; enumeration district: 87, supervisor's district: 74, sheet number: 11B, page number: 93; enumeration date: June 15, 1900

    25. [S27] Kimble, Marjorie Naomi "Marge" (Walker) (Reliability: 3).

    26. [S4157] 1905 Iowa State Census (Reliability: 3).
      Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa; Roll: IA_96

    27. [S72] 1910 US Census (Reliability: 3).
      Morning Sun Township, Louisa County, Iowa; enumeration district: 98, supervisor's district: 1, sheet number: 2B, page number: 107; enumeration date: April 19, 1910

    28. [S8164] Edgar, Bertha Belle (Eddingfield) - Card to Charles Pearsey Walker, (dated "Monday Morning" on the card, postmarked on April 5, 1915, 11 a.m. in New London, Henry County, Iowa) (Reliability: 4).

    29. [S8165] Walker, Lovina Church - Obituary, (originally published in The Morning Sun News-Herald, page 5, March 16, 1916; Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa) (Reliability: 3).

    30. [S19] 1920 US Census (Reliability: 3).
      Morning Sun Township, Louisa County, Iowa; enumeration district: 102; supervisor's district: 1, sheet number: 14B, page number: 240; enumeration date: January 7, 8, and 9, 1920

    31. [S8156] American Civil War Soldiers (ancestry.com) (Reliability: 3).

    32. [S359] Walker Family Bible Record (Reliability: 3).

    33. [S360] Pearsey Family, A History of the, Patrick Robert Pearsey, (personally published, 2002; Indiana) (Reliability: 4).

    34. [S8168] Walker, Charles Pearsey - Funeral Program, (March 1922, Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa; ©1912 by H. F. Wendell, Leipsic, Ohio) (Reliability: 4).

    35. [S8167] Walker, Charles Pearsey - Obituary (Davenport Democrat and Leader), (originally published in The Davenport Democrat and Leader, page 4, March 13, 1922; Davenport, Scott County, Iowa) (Reliability: 3).

    36. [S8166] Walker, Charles Pearsey - Civil War Pension Checks, Doris Daisy (Frizzell) Cartwright (Reliability: 3).

    37. [S8169] Walker, Charles Pearsey - Will Admitted to Probate, (originally published in The Morning Sun News-Herald, front page, April 20, 1922; Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa) (Reliability: 3).

    38. [S360] Pearsey Family, A History of the, Patrick Robert Pearsey, (personally published, 2002; Indiana).

    39. [S365] Indiana Marriages through 1850 (Indiana State Library) (Reliability: 4).

    40. [S361] Wayne County, Indiana - History (1884), Andrew W. Young, (originally published by Inter-State Publishing Company, 1884; Chicago, Cook County, Illinois), pages 728 and 729 (Reliability: 3).

    41. [S362] Walker, Sarah (Lane) - Letter 1862/10/25 to Francis Samuel "Sam" Walker, (October 25, 1862) (Reliability: 4).

    42. [S362] Walker, Sarah (Lane) - Letter 1862/10/25 to Francis Samuel "Sam" Walker, (October 25, 1862) (Reliability: 3).

    43. [S363] Hardin, John Wesley - Letter to Francis Samuel "Sam" Walker, (March 1, 1863) (Reliability: 4).

    44. [S364] Walker Family Monument - Headstone Photograph, (the monument is at the Ferrel Cemetery in New London Township, Henry County, Iowa; photo provided courtesy of "Mo & Dave Gates" at Find A Grave (web site); Related Memorials #: 65285807 & 47151758) (Reliability: 3).

    45. [S38] 1925 Iowa State Census (Reliability: 3).
      Morning Sun Township, Louisa County, Iowa

    46. [S13] Iowa Marriage Collection, 1809 -1992 (Family Search) (Reliability: 3).

    47. [S27] Kimble, Marjorie Naomi "Marge" (Walker) (Reliability: 4).
      Scan of Certificate from Marge Kimble.

    48. [S49] Walker, Charles Pearsey and Ruth Ellen (Fox) - Headstone Photograph, (their grave is at the Ferrel Cemetery, New London Township, Henry County, Iowa; photograph provided courtesy of Marjorie Naomi "Marge" (Walker) Kimble) (Reliability: 3).

    49. [S358] Henry County, Iowa - Marriage Book, page 52 (Reliability: 4).

    50. [S356] Walker, Charles Pearsey and Sarah Ann "Sally" (Houseman) Edger - Marriage Announcement, (originally published in The Morning Sun News-Herald, page 5, July 10, 1902; Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa) (Reliability: 3).

    51. [S357] Edgar, Ann Clarinda (Walker) - Card to Charles Pearsey Walker, Ann Clarinda (Walker) Edgar, (originally sent February 2, 1911) (Reliability: 3).